The Township of Puslinch Farmers Club

Constitution, Bylaws, & Rules

 

 

The Name:

The name of this association shall be the Township of Puslinch Farmers Club.

 

Objects:

The objects of this association shall be for the mutual improvement of its members and the advancement of the agricultural interests of the community.

 

Officers of the Club:

The officers of the club shall consist of a president, vice-president, secretary-treasurer, and a board of managers, not less than seven in number, all of whom shall be chosen annually.

 

Duties of the President:

The duties of the president shall be to preside at all meetings of the club, to open the same punctually, at the stated time, to decide upon all points of order, and when a dispute arises, his decision shall be final.  If the president should choose to take part in any discussion, and in the event of the absence of the vice-president, he may leave the chair and another chairman shall be chosen from among the members of the club, who shall be “chairman pro lieu”.

 

Duties of the Secretary- Treasurer:

It shall be the duties of the secretary-treasurer to keep a correct record of transactions of the club, to enter in a book befit for the purpose, the various subjects discussed, essays written and lectures delivered, also to keep an account of all monies received by him and all monies disbursed for the benefits of the club, and to prepare an annual report of the proceedings of the club, to be read at the annual meeting for the election of officers.

 

Duties of the Board of Managers:

It shall be the duty of the Board of Managers, in conjunction with the President and Vice-President, and Secretary-Treasurer, to carry into effect all measures for the furtherance of the schemes of the club.

 

Quorum:

No less than three members of the Board shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at any meeting of said Board.

 

Annual Meeting:

The annual meeting for the election of officers and the receiving of the report of the Secretary-Treasurer shall be held on the last Saturday of January at the hour of three o’ clock p.m.

 

Regular meetings:

The regular meetings of the club shall be held on the last Saturday of each month, unless otherwise arranged, to be opened punctually at two o’ clock p.m.

 

Change of time or place of meetings, or alterations in the Constitution, may be decided upon at any regular meeting, but notice of motion for such an alteration must be given in writing at the meeting previous to that on which it is to be proposed.

 

Subjects of Discussion:

That, in addition to all purely agricultural subjects and questions bearing directly upon the agricultural interests of the community, shall be deemed a legitimate subject for discussion, provided, always, that no political or religious subjects shall be discussed.

 

Time of speaking:

No member shall be allowed to speak upon the same subject more than twice without the permission of the chair, and not longer than ten minutes at a time.

 

Members fees:

Member fees shall be fifty cents per annum and further assessment may be made, if necessary, by the club.

 

Choosing subjects:

Any member shall have the privilege of proposing any subject for discussion, also one or more members for the purpose of introducing it, such subjects and persons to be chosen by the club.

 

Every member, who may have occasion to speak, shall address the chair.  All motions shall be made in writing.  No person shall interrupt another while speaking, and all persons who may have spoken once to any motion, shall, prior to speaking again, except to explain, obtain permission from the chair.

 

Rules of Order for General Business

 

1.

Reading minutes of previous meeting.

2.

Reports from Board, if any.

3.

Reading of correspondence.

4.

Reports from special committees.

5.

Unfinished business.

6.

General or miscellaneous business.

7.

Arranging subjects for discussion at next meeting.

8.

Introducing subjects for discussion at present meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the Township of Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday the 16th of May 1874, for the purpose of adopting a constitution, bylaws, rules for the guidance of its members, and to elect office bearers for the current year.

 

James H. Glennie occupied the chair.

 

 It was moved by Hugh Cockburn, seconded by Duncan McFarlane, that the constitution, bylaws, and rules, as now read, be adopted.  Carried.

 

It was moved by James Scott, seconded by Robert Little, that Duncan McFarlane be President for the current year.  Carried.

 

It was moved by James Scott, seconded by John Cullen, that Peter Mahon be Vice-President for the current year.  Carried.

 

It was moved by Duncan McFarlane, seconded by Robert Little, that Joseph Grant be Secretary-Treasurer for the current year.  Carried.

 

It was moved by James Scott, seconded by Alexander Smith, that the following gentlemen be appointed a Board of Directors for the current year:  Messrs. John Iles, James H. Glennie, Robert Little, Hugh Cockburn, John Marshall, John Scott, and Peter McLean Jr.

 

It was resolved that the next meeting of the club will be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 3oth instant, 2 o’ clock p.m.  The principal subjects for discussion will be turnip culture, James Anderson, Esq., to lead and the best turnip seed for ordinary soil, Alexander Smith to lead.

 

A vote of thanks was then cordially passed to James H. Glennie, Esq., for his able conduct in the chair, which was duly acknowledged, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

James H. Glennie, Chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the Township of Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 30th day of May, at 2 o’ clock p.m.  Duncan McFarlane, Esq., President, in the chair, the minutes of last meeting were read and confirmed.  The subject for discussion was “Turnip Culture in Canada and Britain”, James Anderson, Esq., leading, Messrs. Glennie, Beattie, and Mahon, following.

 

Peter Mahon, Esq., gave notice of motion at next meeting of this club to amend the constitution so as to admit of discontinuing the regular monthly meetings during the months of July and August.

 

Moved J. H. Glennie, Esq., seconded by Peter McLean, Esq., that the practice of allowing cattle, horses, and pigs running at large is a public nuisance, productive of loss, both to the owner and the country in general, and that it is the opinion of this club that immediate steps should be taken to prevent the same.  Carried.

 

Moved by Robert Beattie, Esq., seconded by Peter Mahon, Esq., that the subject for discussion at the next meeting of this club will be whether the present system of mixed farming is the most profitable that we can follow, Robert Beattie to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Robert Beattie, seconded by Peter Mahon, that a vote of thanks be, and is, hereby tendered to James Anderson, Esq., for his very able, comprehensive, and inexhaustible essay on turnip culture.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was then passed to the President, and the meeting adjourned, to meet again in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 27th day of June, at 2 o’ clock p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Township Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 27th day of June 1874, at 2 o’ clock p.m., Duncan McFarlane, Esq., President, in the chair.  The minutes of last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being whether the present system of mixed farming is the most profitable that we can pursue, Robert Beattie, Esq., leading.

 

James Anderson, Esq., gave notice of motion, at the next meeting of this club, to amend the constitution so as to change the place of meetings at Aberfoyle, Downie Schoolhouse, Arkell Schoolhouse, and Morriston Town Hall, alternately.

 

Moved by Peter Mahon, seconded by James Glennie that clause eight of our constitution be suspended and that the regular monthly meetings be discontinued for the next two months, then to be resumed, as usual, according to our constitution.  Carried.

 

Moved by James Anderson, seconded by Peter Mahon, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting will be the best means of supplying ourselves with agricultural labour, Mr. Glennie to lead; also the best mode of feeding cattle for beef and to consider the prospects of the beef market, Mr. McFarlane to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by James Anderson, seconded by James Glennie, that a vote of thanks be given to Robert Beattie for his valuable and instructive essay.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was then passed to the President and the meeting adjourned, to meet again on Saturday, the 26th of September, at 2 o’clock p.m.

 

Signed,

Duncan McFarlane.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Township of Puslinch Farmers Club was held at Aberfoyle, on Saturday 31st October 1874, at 2 o’ clock p.m., Duncan McFarlane, Esq., President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subjects for discussion being the best means of supplying ourselves with agricultural labour, James Glennie leading, also, the best mode of feeding cattle for beef, Duncan McFarlane, leading.

 

James Anderson, at the last meeting of the club, gave notice of motion at this meeting to amend the constitution so as to change the place of meeting, said meetings to be held at Aberfoyle, Downie Schoolhouse, Arkell Schoolhouse, and Morriston Town Hall, alternately.  That gentleman not being present, it was moved by James Glennie, seconded by Alexander Smith that the above named proposition be adopted and that the next meeting of the club be held in the Downie Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 28th day of November next, at 6 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Moved by James Glennie, seconded by Alexander Smith, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting of the club will be dairy farming, Robert Little to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Alexander Smith, seconded by James Scott, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to James Glennie and Duncan McFarlane for their able and instructive essays.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was then passed to the President and the meeting adjourned, to meet again as above specified.

 

Signed,

Duncan McFarlane.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Downie Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 28th day of November 1874, at 6 o’ clock p.m., Peter Mahon, Vice-President, in the chair, when it was moved by Mr. Maddock, seconded by Mr. Doyle, that this meeting be adjourned until Saturday, the 5th of December, 6 o’clock p.m., at the Downie Schoolhouse, on account of the inclemency of the weather.  The subject for discussion is to be dairy farming, Robert Little leading.  Carried.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, vice-president.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held at the Downie Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 5th of December 1874, 6 o’ clock p.m., Peter Mahon, Vice-President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being “dairy farming”, Robert Little leading.

 

Moved by J. H. Glennie, seconded by Robert Buchanan, that the next meeting be held at the Arkell Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 26th instant, at 6 o’ clock p.m., and that the subject will be the breeding of agricultural horses and the advisability of the club purchasing a stallion, Charles Cockburn to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Robert Buchanan, seconded by James H. Glennie, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to Robert Little for his able and instructive essay.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was then passed to Peter Mahon for his able conduct in the chair and the meeting adjourned, to meet again as above specified.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, vice-president.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch farmers Club was held in the Arkell Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 26th day of December 1874, at 6 o’ clock p.m., Duncan McFarlane, President, in the chair, the subject for discussion being the breeding of agricultural horses and the advisability of the club purchasing a stallion, Charles Cockburn, leading.

 

After considerable discussion, the majority of the meeting were of the opinion that in the event of this club purchasing a stallion, a heavy coach horse would be the most suitable for this section of country.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Anderson, that an annual dinner be held under the auspices of this club and that the following gentlemen be a committee to make arrangements for the same, D. McFarlane, J. H. Glennie, J. Anderson, J. Grant, J. Carter, and the mover, P. Mahon.  Carried.

 

Moved by J. H. Glennie, seconded by Charles Cockburn, that the next and annual meeting of this club be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 30th day of January next, at 2 o’ clock p.m., and the subject will be fruits culture, James Anderson to lead.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was then passed to the President and the meeting adjourned, to meet again as above specified.

 

Signed,

Duncan McFarlane.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Township of Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 30th day of January 1875, Duncan McFarlane, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being fruit culture, James Anderson, leading, after which the reports and financial statement of the club were read by the secretary and adopted by the meeting.  The following gentlemen were then elected office bearers for the current year:

President:

Peter Mahon

Vice-President:

James Anderson

Secretary Treasurer:

Joseph Grant

Directors:

James Glennie, Robert Little, Duncan McFarlane, Robert Buchanan, John Iles, John Marshall, James Scott.

 

Moved by James Anderson, seconded by Robert Little, that in future the monthly meetings be held on the last Friday of each month, at the hour of 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Moved by James Glennie, seconded by James Scott, that the next meeting of this club be held in Morriston Town Hall, on Friday, the 26th of February, at 3 o’clock p.m., the discussion to be the best mode of recuperating worn out soil, Peter Mahon to open the debate.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was cordially passed to the retiring President, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Morriston Town Hall on Friday, the 26th of February, 1875, at 3 o’ clock p.m., Peter Mahon, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being the best mode of recuperating worn out soil, Peter Mahon opening the debate, followed by Messrs. McFarlane, Anderson, and others.

 

It was then moved by James Anderson, seconded by Duncan McFarlane, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Downie Schoolhouse on Friday, the 26th day of March, at 3 o’ clock p.m., the subject for discussion to be the best rotation of crops, James H. Glennie to open the debate.  Carried.

 

Moved by James Anderson, seconded by William Ross, that the secretary be instructed to correspond with the leading wholesale seed merchants for the purchase of seeds and to report at the next meeting.  Carried.

 

Moved by Duncan McFarlane, seconded by James Anderson, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to Mr. Mahon for his instructive essay, which was carried unanimously, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Downie School house on Friday, the 26th of March, 1875, Peter Mahon, President, in the chair, the subject for discussion being the best rotation of crops, J. H. Glennie opening the debate, followed by Messrs. Anderson, Buchanan, and others.

 

It was moved by James Anderson, seconded by J. H. Glennie, that the next meeting of the club be held at the Arkell schoolhouse on the last Saturday of next month, at 3 0’ clock p.m.

 

Moved by J. Anderson, seconded by Martin Spruhan, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting will be thin versus thick sowing, Robert Buchanan to lead, also, hand versus drill sowing, Duncan McFarlane to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Robert Buchanan, seconded by Michael Doyle, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to J. H. Glennie for his instructive essay.  Carried unanimously, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Arkell Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 24th day of April, 1875, at 3 o’ clock p.m., Peter Mahon, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being hand versus drill sowing, Duncan McFarlane opening the debate, followed by Messrs. Murray, Sherrat, Iles, and others.

 

It was moved by Duncan McFarlane, seconded by John Iles, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on the last Saturday of next month, at 3 o’ clock p.m., the subject for discussion to be the best substitute for grass, James Scott to lead, also, the best mode of preparing the soil for turnips, the best variety of seed, etcetera, William Rae to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Duncan McFarlane, seconded by William Rae, that the secretary be instructed to correspond with the Guelph seed merchants with regard to purchasing turnip seed, and report at next meeting.  Carried.

 

Moved by John Iles, seconded by Robert Beattie, that a vote of thanks be tendered to Duncan McFarlane for his able and instructive essay.  Carried unanimously, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

P. Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 31st of May 1875, Peter Mahon, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.  The subject for discussion being the best substitute for grass, James Scott Sr. leading, also the best mode of preparing the soil for turnips, the best variety of seed, etcetera, William Rae to open the debate, followed by Messrs. Anderson, Glennie, and others.

 

The secretary read the various tenders received for turnip seed, when it was moved by J. Anderson, seconded by Wm. Rae, that the tender of Messrs. E. & A. Sharpe be accepted, being the lowest.  Carried.

 

Moved by J. Anderson, seconded by R. Beattie, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Morriston Town Hall on the last Saturday in August, at 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Moved by D. Gilchrist, seconded by C. G. Cockburn, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be fall wheat culture, J. Murray to lead, also, the best breeds of fowl to raise, J. Laing to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by R. Beattie, seconded by William Kerr, that a vote of thanks be tendered to Messrs. Scott and Rae for their valuable and instructive discourse.  Carried unanimously, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Morriston Town Hall, on Saturday, the 30th of August 1875, Peter Mahon, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being wheat culture, John Murray leading, also, the best kind of fowl to raise, John Laing leading, followed by Messrs. Anderson, Glennie, Gilchrist, Sorby, and others, after which it was moved by James Anderson, seconded by Harold Sorby, that the next meeting of the club be held in Downie Schoolhouse on the last Saturday in September next.  Carried.

 

Moved by J. Murray, seconded by J. Anderson, that the subject for discussion be the best method of destroying the grasshopper pest, Duncan Gilchrist to lead, also, the breeding and fattening of hogs, John Laing to open the debate.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Rae, that our meetings in Morriston be discontinued, as no encouragement has been given from those in that neighbourhood.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Rae, seconded by Mr. Anderson, that a vote of thanks be tendered to the Messrs. Murray and Laing for their able and very instructive discourses.  Carried unanimously, and the meeting was adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Anderson, Vice-President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Downey’s Schoolhouse, on Saturday, the 25th of September 1875, James Anderson, Vice-President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being the grasshopper pest, Duncan Gilchrist to lead, also, hog breeding and feeding, John Laing leading, followed by Messrs. Glennie, Buchanan, Anderson, and others, after which it was moved by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Mr. Anderson, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Arkell Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 30th of October next, at 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Gilchrist, that the subject for discussion be the best mode of feeding cattle for beef, J. Glennie to lead, also, the most profitable breed of sheep for the farmer to keep, Robert Beattie to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Buchanan, seconded by Mr. Beattie, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to Messrs. Laing and Anderson for their able and instructive discourses, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Arkell’s Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 30th of October 1875, Peter Mahon, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being the best breed of sheep for the farmer to raise, Robert Beattie opening the debate, followed by Messrs. Murray, Iles, Carter, Laing, and others, after which it was moved by Mr. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Laing, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 27th of November next, at 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

 Moved by Mr. Beattie, seconded by Mr. Murray, that as Mr. Glennie has not put in an appearance to lead on cattle feeding, as per programme, that the said subject be taken up at the next meeting, and that Mr. Glennie will open the debate.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Laing, seconded by Mr. Scott, that it will also be expedient to discuss what are the most profitable kinds of spring grain to raise, Mr. Murray to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Carter, seconded by Mr. Iles, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to Mr. Beattie for his able and instructive discourse.  Carried unanimously, and the meeting adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The regular meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 27th of November 1875, Peter Mahon, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being cattle feeding, J. H. Glennie leading, followed by Messrs. Laing, Rae, and others, after which it was moved by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Mr. Rae, that the next meeting of the club be held in Downey’s Schoolhouse on Friday, the 24th of December, at 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. McFarlane, seconded by Mr. Glennie, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be the best kind of spring grain to raise, J. Murray to lead, also, cattle versus sheep feeding, William Rae to open the debate.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. McFarlane, seconded by Mr. Glennie, that an annual dinner be held under the auspices of this club and that a committee be appointed at its next meeting to carry the same into effect.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Hume, seconded by Mr. Laing, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to Mr. Glennie for his able and instructive discourse.  Carried unanimously, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Downey’s Schoolhouse on Friday, the 24th of December 1875, Peter Mahon, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being the best kind of grain to raise, J, Murray to lead, also, cattle versus sheep feeding, Wm. Rae to lead.  It was moved by Mr. Buchanan, seconded by Mr. Doyle, that on account of the inclement weather, the consideration of the subjects to have been discussed at this meeting, be laid over until a further meeting.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Mr. Anderson, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 29th of January 1876, at 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Spruhan, seconded by Mr. Downey, that the proposition of Mr. Knowles to deliver a lecture on agricultural chemistry at our next and annual meeting be accepted and that the freedom of the floor be given to him on that occasion.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Buchanan, seconded by Mr. Hume, that the following gentlemen be a committee to make arrangements for the holding of the annual dinner in connection with this club.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was cordially passed to the chairman, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 29th of January 1876, Peter Mahon, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being agricultural chemistry by R. H. Knowles, after which a vote of thanks was unanimously accorded the lecturer for his able and instructive discourse.  The financial statement of the club was then read and adopted by the meeting.

 

The following gentlemen were elected office bearers for the current year:

President:

James Anderson

Vice-President:

James Glennie

Secretary-Treasurer:

Joseph Grant

Directors:

Duncan McFarlane, Robert Beattie, Robert Little, William Rae, John Iles, Robert Buchanan, Peter Mahon, Hugh McNaughton.

 

It was then moved by Duncan Gilchrist, seconded by James Anderson, that the secretary be allowed twelve dollars of a salary for the past year.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. McFarlane, that the next meeting of the club be held in Arkell schoolhouse on Saturday, the 26th of February next, at 3 o’ clock p.m., the subjects for discussion to be the best kind of spring grain to raise, J. Murray to lead, also, cattle versus sheep feeding, William Rae to lead.  Carried.

 

Mr. Anderson, being moved to the chair, a vote of thanks was cordially tendered to the retiring President for his impartial conduct while presiding over the deliberations of the club for the past year, which was duly acknowledged, and the meeting adjourned.

 

signed,

James Anderson, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Arkell Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 26th of February 1876, James Anderson, President, in the chair, the subjects for discussion being the best kind of spring grain to raise, J. Murray leading, also, cattle versus sheep feeding, Wm. Rae leading, followed by Messrs. Anderson, McFarlane, Glennie, Beattie, and others.

 

It was then move by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Mr. McFarlane, that the secretary be instructed to make application to a few of the leading seedsmen for tenders for seeds and to report at the next meeting.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Buchanan, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting will be the culture and treatment of gooseberry and currant bushes, Mr. Anderson to lead, also, the best mode of procedure for preparing the soil for a seed bed, Mr. McFarlane to lead.

 

Moved by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Mr. Buchanan, that the next meeting of the club be held in Downey’s schoolhouse on Saturday, the 25th of March 1876, at 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Beattie, seconded by Mr. Iles, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to the Messrs. Murray and Rae for their able and instructive essays.  Carried unanimously, and the meeting adjourned.

 

signed,

James Anderson, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Downey’s Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 25th of March 1876, James Anderson, President, in the chair, the subject for discussion being the culture of gooseberry and currant bushes, James Anderson leading, also, the best mode of preparing the soil for a seed bed, Duncan McFarlane leading, followed by Messrs. Glennie, Spruhan, Buchanan, and others.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. McFarlane, that the tender of Mr. Marcon for seeds be accepted, being the lowest.  Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Spruhan, that the next meeting of the club be held in Aberfoyle on Saturday, the last in April, at the usual hour, and that Professor Brown be requested to deliver a lecture, the subject to be chosen by him.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was then accorded Messrs. Anderson and McFarlane for their able discourse, and the meeting adjourned, to meet again, as above specified.

 

Signed,

James Anderson, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 29th of April 1876, at 3 o’ clock p.m., James Anderson, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being the inconsistency of farming by Professor Brown of the School of Agriculture.  The subject being thoroughly discussed, it was moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Laing, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered Mr. Brown for his able and instructive lecture.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. McFarlane, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Arkell Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 7th of May next, at the usual hour, the subjects for discussion being the best green crop to plough under for manure, Mr. Reid to open the debate, also the relative merits of root and forage crops, Mr. Glennie to lead.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks being passed to the chairman, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Anderson, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Arkell Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 23rd of May last, at 3 o’ clock p.m., James Anderson, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were confirmed, the subject for discussion being the best green crop to plough under for manure, Hugh Reid leading, followed by Messrs. Johnston, Stirton, Buchanan, and others. 

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Buchanan, that in the opinion of this meeting it is advisable to discontinue our regular meetings during the busy season and that the next meeting of the club be held on the last Saturday in September in Downey’s Schoolhouse, at the usual hour.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Iles, seconded by Mr. Orme, that the subject for discussion be the best mode of feeding cattle, Mr. J. H. Glennie to open the debate.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Johnston, seconded by Mr. Innes, that a vote of thanks be tendered Mr. Reid for his very instructive discourse.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was then passed to the chairman, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Anderson, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Downey’s Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 30th of September 1876, at 3 o’ clock p.m., James Anderson, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject under discussion being the bets mode of feeding cattle, J. H. Glennie leading, followed by Messrs. Mahon, Buchanan, Doyle, and others, after which it was moved by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Mr. Mahon, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Agricultural Hall, Aberfoyle, on the last Saturday of next month,  at 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried. 

 

Mr. J. H. Glennie gave notice of a motion at the next meeting of the club to amend parts of section twelve of the constitution, so as to alter the place of meeting, and that the November meeting of the club be held in the Schoolhouse No. 11, to be held there in regular rotation, provided that sufficient encouragement is given to the club.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Downey, seconded by Mr. Mahon, that a vote of thanks be tendered to Mr. Glennie for his able and instructive discourse.  Carried.  A vote of thanks was then passed to the chairman, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Glennie, Vice-President.

 

 

 

 

 

The monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Agricultural Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 30th of October 1876, J. H. Glennie, Vice-President in the chair.

 

The subject under discussion was the best mode of raising, feeding, and disposing of beef cattle remuneratively, J. H. Glennie to open the debate, followed by Messrs. Reid, Mahon, and others.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Reid, that the next meeting of the club be held in Schoolhouse No. 11, on the last Saturday of next month, at 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Marshall, that the subject for discussion be the necessity for systematic agriculture, Mr. Mahon to open the debate.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Marshall, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to Mr. Glennie for his able and instructive essay, with the request that Mr. Glennie would consent to have his essay published.  Carried, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Robert Little, Chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Schoolhouse No. 11, on Saturday December the 9th 1876, Robert Little in the chair.  The subject under discussion was the necessity of systematic agriculture, Peter Mahon leading.  After a lively discussion of the subject, it was moved by Mr. Eagle, seconded by Mr. Ross, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Arkell Schoolhouse, on Saturday, the 30th instant, at 3 o’ clock p.m.  Carried. 

 

Moved by Mr. Eagle, seconded by Mr. Mahon, that the subject for discussion be whether it is most profitable to feed cattle for beef or feed cattle for the dairy.  Carried.  Moved by Mr. Barrett, seconded by Mr. Bond, that a vote of thanks is due and is hereby tendered to Mr. Mahon for his able essay, and requests that the same be published.  Carried unanimously, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Arkell Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 5th of January 1877, at 3 o’ clock p.m., Mr. James Anderson, President, in the chair, the subject under discussion being whether it is as profitable to feed cows and make butter as it is to feed for beef, which discussion elicited an opinion that butter making would be remunerative, and, at least, it is worthy of the attention of this club to give it a trial and report.

 

Move by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Iles, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on the last Saturday of this month, at 3 o’ clock p.m., and that the subject for discussion be the application of artificial manures, and its results, and whether it would pay, James Anderson to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. McFarlane, seconded by Mr. Iles, that an annual dinner be held under the auspices of this club and that the following gentlemen be appointed to make the necessary arrangements, J. Carter, P. Mahon, W. Rae, J. Glennie, R. Little, D. McFarlane, and J. Grant, the said committee to meet at the Mooney Hotel on Tuesday, the 9th instant, at 2 o’ clock p.m.  Carried, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Anderson.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the committee appointed to make arrangements for the annual dinner under the auspices of this club met at Mooney’s Hotel on Tuesday, the 9th day of January 1877, at 2 o’ clock p.m., James Glennie in the chair.

 

Moved by Mr. Rae, seconded by Mr. Carter, that the annual dinner take place at the Mooney Hotel on Tuesday, the 23rd instant, at 8 o’ clock p.m., tickets 5o cents, and that complimentary tickets be sent to the following gentlemen, the President and Secretary of the Dumfries Farmers Club, the President and Secretary of the Erin Club, D. Stirton of Guelph, Dr. Orton of Fergus P.O., J. Johnston and Brown of the School of Agriculture, D. Guthrie, M.P. of Guelph, G. Murton and C. Sharp of Guelph.  Carried.

 

Signed,

James Glennie, Chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 27th of January 1877, James Anderson in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion was artificial manures and their effects, and will they pay, James Anderson to lead, followed by Messrs. Buchanan, Mahon, Reid, and others, after which the annual report was read by the secretary and adopted by the meeting.

 

The following gentlemen were then elected office bearers for the current year:

President:

J. H. Glennie

Vice-President:

William Rae

Secretary-Treasurer:

Joseph Grant

Directors:

J. Scott (Plains), Wm. Kerr, John Iles, R. Beattie, D. McFarlane, P. Mahon, H. Reid, J. Anderson, R. Buchanan, R. Little, A. Smith.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Buchanan, that the next meeting of the club be held in Downey Schoolhouse on the last Saturday of next month, at 3 o’ clock p.m., and that the subject for discussion be the best mode of raising grass, Mr. Smith to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Iles, seconded by Mr. Reid, that a vote of thanks be and is hereby tendered to the retiring president for his impartial conduct while presiding over the deliberations of the club for the past year, and for his able and instructive essay.  Carried, which vote was duly acknowledged, and the meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

J. H. Glennie, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Downey’s Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 10th of March 1877, James H. Glennie, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject for discussion being the best mode of raising grasses, A. Smith leading, followed by Messrs. Mahon, Buchanan, Doyle, Scott, and others, after which tenders were reviewed, received from Messrs. Collins and O’ Connor, and Cossitt, of Guelph, for gang ploughs, when on motion, made and seconded, it was decided to accept that of Cossitt’s, it being the lowest.

 

Moved by Mr. Buchanan, seconded by Mr. Mahon, that the secretary be instructed to solicit tenders from a few of the leading seedsmen of Guelph to supply the club with seeds for the current year, and to report at the next meeting.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Doyle, seconded by Mr. Downey, that the next meeting of the club be held in Dickie Schoolhouse on Saturday, the 31st instant, at 3 o’ clock p.m. and that the subject be the breeding of sheep and the prevention of cotted wool, J. H. Glennie to open the debate, and also, the relative merits of salt and plaster on grass.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was then passed to Mr. Smith for his able and instructive essay, with the request that it should be published, and the meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

James H. Glennie, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in School Section No. 11, on Saturday, the 31st of March 1877, James Glennie, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the subject under discussion being the best breeding of sheep and the prevention of cotted wool, also the relative merits of salt and plaster on grass, J. H. Glennie leading, followed by Messrs. Anderson, Mahon, Reid, Buchanan, and others, after which the various tenders received for seeds were read by the secretary, when on motion made by Mr. Anderson, seconded by Mr. Reid, that the tender of Mr. McElderry of Guelph be accepted, it being the lowest.  Carried.

 

 Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Reid, that Messrs. J. Scott and Elijah Eagle be added to the list of directors of the club.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Buchanan, seconded by Mr. Ross, that the next meeting of the club be held in Arkell Schoolhouse on Saturday of next month at 3 o’ clock p.m., and as the limited time at our disposal this evening prevented the full discussion of salt and plaster, that the subject be taken up at the next meeting, also the desirableness of procuring fresh seeds, Mr. Buchanan to open the debate.  Carried, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

R. Beattie, Chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 30th of June 1877, James Glennie, President, in the chair.

 

The minutes of the last meeting, not having been engrossed, were not confirmed.  Moved by Mr. Rae, seconded by Mr. McFarlane, that Mr. P. Mahon be appointed secretary-treasurer in place of Joseph Grant, deceased.  Carried.

 

A very able and instructive essay on agricultural chemistry was read by Mr. David McFarlane, which was well received, after which an interesting discussion followed, sustained by Messrs. Glennie, McFarlane, Rae, McLaren, Gilchrist, Mahon, and others.

 

Upon motion, it was resolved to discontinue the regular meetings for two months.

 

Moved by Mr. McFarlane, seconded by Mr. Rae, that the next meeting be held at Downies School House on the last Saturday of September 1877.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Rae, seconded by Mr. McFarlane, that the subject for next meeting be how to make the profession of agriculture more profitable, popular, and attractive to the rising generation, Mr. James Glennie to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. McLaren, seconded by Mr. Rae, that the thanks of this meeting is due and is hereby tendered to Mr. McFarlane for his able essay and that he be requested to publish it.  Carried, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Glennie, President.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Temperance Hall, School Section No. 11, on Saturday, the 10th of October, Mr. James Glennie, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were confirmed.  Mr. James Glennie delivered an address on the best mode of making the profession of agriculture more profitable, popular, and attractive to the rising generation, followed by Messrs. Barrett, Ellis, Eagle, Mahon, and others.

 

Moved by Mr. Eagle, seconded by Mr. Barrett, that the subject to be discussed at the next meeting held here be potato cultivation, Mr. Charles Barrett to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. E. Eagle, seconded by J. Eagle, that the next meeting of the club be held at Arkell.  Carried.

 

The sense of the meeting was expressed in favour of the importation of seed wheat from Manitoba, or some other approved place, and also instructed the secretary to make enquiries through the press for information on the subject, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Glennie, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 29th of December 1877, Mr. James Glennie, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

 It was moved by Alex Smith, seconded by John Marshall, that this meeting adjourn until two o’ clock p.m., on the last Saturday of January 1878.  Carried.

 

Moved by Duncan McFarlane, seconded by John Marshall, that the club hold a social this year instead of a dinner, and that the following gentlemen be a committee to make the necessary arrangements, namely J. Glennie, W. Rae, Thomas Carter, Jas. Anderson, Jas. Eagle, P. Mahon, and H. Reid, with the power to add to their number.  Carried, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed, James Glennie, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday, the 26th of January 1878, James Glennie, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

 

Moved by W. Rae, seconded by D. Gilchrist, that the secretary be paid a sum of $12 for services rendered in 1877.  Carried.

 

The financial statement of the club was then read by the secretary and adopted by the meeting.  The following gentlemen were elected office bearers for the current year:

President:

W. Rae

Vice-President:

Robt. Buchanan

Secretary-Treasurer:

P. Mahon

Directors:

D. McFarlane, D. Gilchrist, Jas. Scott, Neil Marshall, Jas. Anderson, Thos. Carter, Jas. Scott (Arkell), Jas. Eagle, W. Kerr, Alex Smith, and James Glennie

Auditors:

Jas Scott and John Iles

 

Moved by D. McFarlane, seconded by Jas. Scott, that the next meeting of the club be held in the Temperance Hall, School Section No. 11, on Saturday the 23rd of February, and after that, that the perambulating system be discontinued and that the meetings of the club henceforth be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Carter, that the regular meetings of the club be not held on the last Saturday of the month as heretofore, but that they be held on the Friday immediately preceding full moon, at 6 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Robt. Buchanan, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting at Aberfoyle be agriculture as a profession, P. Mahon to lead.  Carried.

 

Mr. Duncan McFarlane, being moved to the chair, a cordial vote of thanks was tendered to the retiring President for his impartial conduct while presiding over the deliberations of the club for the past year, which was duly acknowledged, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

R. Little, Chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Temperance Hall, School Section No. 11, on Saturday, the 23rd of February 1878.  In the absence of Mr. Wm. Rae, President, Mr. Robert Little was, upon motion, called to the chair.

 

The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved, the subject for discussion being potato culture, the gentleman appointed to lead, Mr. Barrett, not putting in an appearance, the subject was taken up by the meeting, an interesting and instructive discussion followed, sustained by Messrs. Mahon, Cooper, Eagle, Little, Scott, Ellis, and others.

 

A letter, having been read by the secretary, from Mr. W. T. Smith of Elora, offering Manitoba seed wheat for sale, the meeting thought it inadvisable to purchase, owing to the unsatisfactory reports concerning the same.

 

Mr. Jas. Eagle introduced the matter of clover seed and submitted the name of a producer who was prepared to supply the club.  The secretary was instructed to communicate with the party and obtain the necessary information, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Rae, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 15th of March 1878, Mr. Wm. Rae, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject of the evening was agriculture as a profession.  Mr. P. Mahon opened the debate orally, he, owing to unforeseen circumstances, having been unable to complete an essay on the subject, followed by Messrs. Gilchrist, Patterson, Cooper, Smith, Reid, and Glennie.

 

  The secretary laid before the meeting samples of a Manitoba seed wheat and Golden Drop, grown at Barrie, and forwarded by Mr. Jas. Goldie, price $1.40 and $1.30, respectively, also one provided by Mr. J. S. Armstrong, imported from Minnesota, price $1.75.

 

Tenders offering to supply the club with seeds were reviewed, from Messrs. S. Hallet, McElderry, and Marcon.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Glennie, that Mr. Hallet’s tender be accepted.  Lost.

 

Moved, in amendment, by Mr. Worthington, seconded by Mr. Smith, that Mr. McElderry’s tender be accepted.  Carried.

 

A number of orders for land salt were given in to the secretary, and he was instructed to supply the same, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Rae, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, the 12th of April 1878, Mr. Wm. Rae, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject of the evening was agriculture as a profession, Mr. P. Mahon leading by reading an essay on the subject.  On the motion of Mr. Wm. Johnston, seconded by Mr. John Marshall, a vote of thanks was tendered to the essayist, after which, a very able address was delivered by Mr. Johnston, followed by Messrs. Cooper, McLaren, Gilchrist, Falconbridge, and others.

 

Moved by Mr. R. Beattie, seconded by Mr. D. Gilchrist, that the subject for the next meeting be the advisability of establishing a Farmers Convention for the province of Ontario, and that Mr. Peter McLaren be appointed to read an essay on the subject.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. J. Worthington, seconded by Mr. Cooper that the tender of Messrs. A. G. Gill & Co. offering to supply the club with land plaster be accepted, and that the secretary be instructed to have the same shipped to Hespeler.  Carried.

 

Mr. Mahon suggested the advisability of establishing a semi-annual seed fair in connection with the club.  A number of orders for plaster were handed in, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Wm. Rae, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held at the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 10th of May 1878, Mr. Wm. Rae, President, in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for debate was the advisability of establishing a Framers Convention for the province of Ontario.  Mr. Peter McLaren read a very able essay on the subject that was well received by the meeting, and upon the motion of Mr. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Laing, Mr. McLaren was tendered a cordial vote of thanks.

 

The establishment of a seed fair was then considered, when it was moved by D. McFarlane, seconded by James Glennie, that a semi-annual seed fair in connection with the club be established.  Carried.

 

Moved by D. McFarlane, seconded by D. Gilchrist, that the President and the Directors be a committee to draft rules and regulations to govern said seed fair, and report at the next meeting.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. D. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Alex Smith, that the subject for the next meeting be the importance of a judicious rotation of crops, Mr. D. Gilchrist to open the debate.  Carried, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Rae, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, 14th of June 1878.  Mr. Wm. Rae, President, occupied the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject chosen for debate was the importance of a judicious rotation of crops.  Mr. Duncan Gilchrist opened the debate by reading an essay on the subject that was well received by the meeting, followed by Messrs. McFarlane, Smith, Cooper, Kerr, McFarlane, Worthington, Patterson, Arkell, and others.

 

The committee appointed to draft rules and regulations to govern the seed fair presented their report, which, upon the motion of Mr. Worthington, seconded by Mr. Patterson, was received and adopted, and ordered to be engrossed in the minutes, a copy of which is herewith annexed.

 

Moved by Mr. Cooper, seconded by Mr. Worthington, that the subject for next meeting be, “Which is, the soiling or the pasture system, the most profitable to the farmer?”, Mr. David McFarlane to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Duncan McFarlane, seconded by Mr Cooper, that the thanks of the meeting is now due and is hereby tendered to the essayist for his able essay.  Carried.

 

Tenders were read by the secretary from manufacturers of Suliky(?) or Solitery(?) rakes, offering to supply the club at reduced rates, on which, there was no action taken, and the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Jas. Glennie, Chairman.

 


 

Report of Committee in Reference to the Seed Fair

 

They would recommend:

1.

That the fair shall be open to all comers.

2.

Parties may enter samples with the secretary for competition in their respective classes.

3.

Samples so entered for competition shall be inspected by judges appointed by the Directors, who may award prizes therefore according to the various degrees of merit.

4.

Any person entering must before doing so become a member of the club, if not previously a member.

5.

All samples must contain not less than 10 bushels.

6.

All entries must be made before the hour of 11:00 o’ clock a.m., at which hour the secretary’s books will be finally closed.

7.

It shall be the duty of the Directors to procure a weigh scales for the use of the members for the purpose of facilitating the sale or exchange of seed at such fair.

 

Signed,

James Glennie, Chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 16th of August 1878.  A meeting of the Directors of the club having been called to arrange the prize list for the seed fair, Mr. Jas. Glennie was appointed chairman.  It was, however, thought advisable to submit the matter to the consideration of the meeting generally, which was accordingly done.

 

Moved by Jas. Patterson, seconded by Mr. McFarlane, that there be 4 classes of winter wheat, and that the prizes in each class shall be 1st prize — $3, 2nd — $2, 3rd — $1, 4th — 50 cents.  Carried.

 

On motion, it was decided to class wheat in the following order, namely:

1.

White wheat

Clawson

Silver Chaff

Any other variety of white wheat

2.

Red winter wheat

 

 

Moved by Mr. Neil Marshall, seconded by Jas. Galloway, that the show be held on Monday August 26th.  Lost.

 

Moved, in amendment, by Wm. Rae, seconded by Jas. Patterson, that the show be held on Tuesday August 27th.  Carried.

 

The debate was opened by Mr. David McFarlane, reading a very able and exhaustive paper on soiling versus the pasture system.  A very interesting discussion followed, sustained by Messrs. Glennie, Reid, Arkell, Rae, Patterson, Mahon, Duncan McFarlane, and others.

 

On the motion of Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Rae, a cordial vote of thanks was tendered Mr. McFarlane for his able essay.

 

Moved by Mr. Rae, seconded by Mr. Reid, that the subject for the next meeting be drilling versus broadcast seeding, Henry Arkell to lead.  Carried, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Rae, President.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held at the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, the 18th of October 1878.  The President, Mr. William Rae, occupied the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for debate, as per arrangement, was drilling versus broadcast seeding.  Mr. Henry Arkell opened the debate the debate by reading an essay on the subject, followed by Messrs. William Rae, McFarlane, Gilchrist, Mahon, and others.

 

The matter of a communication from Mr. W. F. Clark relating to a lecture on agriculture was then considered.  It was moved by Mr. David McFarlane, seconded by Mr. Henry Arkell, that Mr. W. F. Clark, having consented to deliver a lecture before the club, that the secretary is hereby instructed to make the necessary arrangements and announcements therefore.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. D. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. McFarlane, that the vote of thanks is due and is hereby tendered to Mr. Arkell for his able essay.  Carried, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Rae, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, the 8th of November 1878.  The President, Mr. William Rae, occupied the chair, the chairman, on calling the meeting to order, introduced the lecturer of the evening, Mr. W. F. Clark.  The lecturer took for his subject “My Farm at Lindenbank”, delivering there from a very interesting and instructive discourse, which was attentively listened to throughout and frequently applauded.  Several other members made some remark, when, on the motion of Robert Little, seconded by Mr. McFarlane, a cordial vote of thanks was tendered the lecturer, and suitably acknowledged.

 

Moved by Mr. Hugh Reid, seconded by Mr. John Iles, that the thanks of the club is due the Montreal Witness for having inaugurated the lecture just delivered.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Mr. Little, that the subject for the next meeting be how best to secure a good catch of clover and its value as fertilizer, Mr. Little to lead.  Carried, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Rae, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held at the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 31st of January 1879.  The President, Mr. William Rae, occupied the chair.

 

The treasurer presented the financial statement of the club for the year 1878, when, it was moved by Mr. Hugh Reid, seconded by Mr. Thos. Carter, that the treasurer’s report be received and adopted.  Carried.

 

A discussion having arisen in reference to the committee who carried out the social, it was moved by Mr. James Patterson, seconded by Mr. Joseph Smith, that it is expedient to interfere with the matter, or to discuss it further.  Carried.

 

The following gentlemen were elected office bearers for the current year:

 

President:

Robert Buchanan

Vice-President:

Hugh Reid

Secretary-Treasurer:

Peter Mahon

Directors:

Duncan McFarlane, William Rae, Duncan Gilchrist, Neil Marshall, William Black, James Glennie, Thomas Carter, James Patterson, John Clark, James Eagle, and John McFarlane.

Auditors:

James Scott and William Kerr

 

Moved by William Rae, seconded by Joseph Smith, that Mr. Wm. Brown of the Agricultural College be invited to address the club at its next meeting.  Carried.

 

Moved by Hugh Reid, seconded by James Black, that the secretary be paid the sum of eight dollars for extra services in 1878.  Carried.

 

Moved by Duncan McFarlane, seconded by James Scott, that the President do now leave the chair and that Mr. Buchanan do take the same.  A cordial vote of thanks was then tendered the retiring President for his able and impartial conduct while presiding over the deliberations of the club, which was suitably acknowledged by that gentleman, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Robert Buchanan, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, the 7th of March 1879, Mr. Robert Buchanan in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Mr. Wm. Brown of the Agricultural College, on being introduced by the President, addressed the meeting, taking as his subject “Why the manure heap only?”, followed by the President and Messrs. Reid, Laing, Smith, McFarlane, and Rae, after which, Mr. Brown replied to various questions and objections, to the satisfaction of the meeting.

 

Letters were read by the secretary in relation to plaster and the purchase of clover seed, on which there was no action taken.

 

Moved by Wm. Rae, seconded by Neil Marshall, that the President, Secretary, and Messrs. David McFarlane, Hugh Reid, and the mover, be a committee to meet and confer with the committee appointed by the Eramosa branches to consider the Guelph Market Imposition.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Rae, that the seed fair be held on the 25th of March and that the Directors meet on the 10th to make arrangements for the same.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Smith, that the subject for the next meeting be markets and market fees in general, Mr. J. Murray to lead.  Carried, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Rae, chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, April 18th 1879.  Mr. Wm. Rae, in the absence of the President, appointed chairman.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Mr. John Murray read a very practical and comprehensive essay on the subject of markets and market fees, which was highly appreciated by the meeting, followed, in debate, by the chairman, and Messrs. Cooper, Norris, Worthington, Mahon, and others.

 

Move by Mr. Jno. Worthington, seconded by Mr. Thos. Cooper, that the secretary be instructed to write Mr. Charles Sharpe to address the club at the next meeting on the subject of grasses.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Cooper, seconded by Mr. Norris, that a vote of thanks be tendered Mr. Murray for his interesting address.  Carried, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

John Worthington.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on the 9th of May 1879.  Mr. Robert Buchanan, President, occupied the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion being grasses, the merits and cultivation of the various varieties, Mr. Charles Sharpe of Guelph opened the debate by reading a very elaborate essay on the subject, which was well received by the meeting, followed by the President and Messrs. Reid, Glennie, Rae, and others.

 

Moved by William Rae, seconded by John Murray, that the monthly meetings be discontinued for the space of three months.  Lost

 

Moved, in amendment, by Duncan Gilchrist, seconded by John Smith, that the meetings be continued monthly, as usual.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Murray, that the thanks of the meeting is due and is hereby tendered to Mr. Sharpe for his able essay.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. James Glennie, seconded by Mr. William Rae, that the subject for the next meeting be artificial manures, Mr. Reid to open the debate.  Carried.

 

Tenders in relation to root seeds were read by the secretary, when it was moved by Mr. Wm. Rae, seconded by Mr. Jas. Glennie, that the tender of Hallett & Co. be accepted.  Carried, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

John Worthington.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, the 4th of July 1879.  Mr. John Worthington was, in the absence of the President, appointed chairman.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Mr. Hugh Reid opened the debate by reading a paper on artificial manures, followed by the Chairman, and others, and afterwards, Mr. Reid, in explanation.

 

The thanks of the meeting was, upon motion, tendered to Mr. Reid for his able address.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Jas. Black, that the regular monthly meetings be discontinued for a space of two months.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. McKarrahee, that the subject for the next meeting be thick versus thin seeding.  Carried.

 

The secretary-treasurer, P. Mahon, tendered his resignation, which was, after some discussion, on the motion of Mr. Reid, seconded by John Smith, accepted, upon condition that he consent to perform the duties of that office until his successor could be appointed, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Robert Buchanan, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 3rd of October 1879.  Mr. Robert Buchanan, President, occupied the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Mr. Hugh Reid opened the debate by an address on thick and thin seeding, followed by Mr. McNaughton, the President, Mr. Schultz, and others.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Smith, that Mr. J. T. Brill be invited to address the club at its next meeting, on the butter factory system.  Carried.

 

The propriety of giving some fitting expression of our regard as a club for Mr. William Johnston, retiring President of the Agricultural College, was then considered, when it was moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Wm. Taylor, that the club do give the sum of ten dollars towards a testimonial to be given to Mr. Johnston as an appreciation of his services in the interest of agriculture.  Carried.

 

It was further resolved that the President and the Secretary be a deputation to represent the club at the presentation of said testimonial.

 

A note of thanks was tendered Mr. Reid for his able address, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Hugh Reid, Vice-President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in ______ on _______ of November. (The place and date were left blank.)  In the absence of the President, Mr. Hugh Reid, Vice-President, occupied the chair.  The Vice-President introduced Mr. J. T. Brill to the meeting, who was present at the invitation of the club.  Mr. Brill delivered an address on the Butter Factory system as practised by himself, enlarged on the profitableness of the system compared with the old established practice of the farmer’s dairy and offered to establish a butter factory upon certain conditions.  The subject was laid over for further consideration.

 

Signed,

Robert Buchanan, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on the 26th of December 1879, the Vice-President, Mr. Hugh Reid, in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject of butter factories was then discussed, Mr. Alex Smith opening the debate, which was generally engaged in by the meeting afterward, a considerable diversity of opinion was entertained upon the subject, when it was moved by John Scott, seconded by J. Worthington, that Alex Smith, Jas. Patterson, and Joseph Smith be a committee to make inquiries with a view to obtain further information in regard to the marketing of the system and the profits to the farmers accruing there from.  Carried.

 

The annual entertainment held by the club was then considered.  Moved by D. Gilchrist, seconded by Wm. Rae, that the entertainment do take the form of a social.  Carried.

 

On motion, a large and effective committee was appointed to make the necessary arrangements.  The committee afterwards met on the 29th and decided to hold the social on the 21st of January 1880.

 

Signed,

Robert Buchanan, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on the 31st of January 1880, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The Treasurer presented the financial statement for the year, which, on motion, was accepted.

 

Moved by Hugh Reid, seconded by Wm. Black, that the secretary be paid the sum of eight dollars for extra services for the current year.  Carried.

 

Moved by John Worthington, seconded by Duncan McFarlane, that Hugh Reid be appointed President.  Carried.

 

Moved by James Hume, seconded by Wm. Taylor, that Duncan Gilchrist be appointed Vice-President.  Carried.

 

It was carried, on motion, that Wm. Rae be appointed Secretary-Treasurer.

 

The following Directors were then appointed:  Thomas Carter, Henry Arkell, Peter Mahon, Robert Buchanan, John Murray, Duncan McFarlane, Neil Marshall, Wm. Black, Jas. Glennie, Jas. Patterson, John Clark, Jas. Eagle, John Smith, and Wm. Taylor.

 

Auditors: James Scott and Wm. Kerr.

 

Mr. Hugh Reid was then moved to the chair, when a vote of thanks was tendered to the retiring President.  Carried.

 

A vote of thanks was also moved to the retiring secretary, which was likewise carried.

 

Moved by Wm. Kerr, seconded by John Worthington, that Professor Penton be invited to address the club at the next meeting.  Carried.

 

Signed,

Hugh Reid, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Thursday, the 26th day of February 1880, Mr. Hugh Reid, President, in the chair.  The minutes of last meeting were and confirmed.

 

Mr. Penton of the Agricultural College delivered an essay on the chemistry of superphosphates.  The lecturer handled the subject very ably, showing its nature and qualities in a clear and simple manner.

 

It was then moved by P. Falconbridge, seconded by Duncan Gilchrist, that a vote of thanks be tendered to Mr. Penton for his able and instructive essay.  Carried.

 

Moved by James Patterson, seconded by John Smith, that the seed fair be held on the 1st of April.  Carried.

 

Moved by James Patterson, seconded by Alexander Smith, that a meeting of the directors be held on Wednesday, the 10th of March, to arrange a prize list for the seed fair and to consider the advisability of giving prizes for the best stallion.  Carried.

 

Moved by James Patterson, seconded by Duncan Gilchrist, that the subject for the next meeting be the best mode of seeding down the land for hay and pasture, A. Smith to lead.  Carried.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Hugh Reid, President.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the directors of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, on Wednesday, the 10th ultima, March 1880, for the purpose of arranging the prize list for the seed fair and considering the advisability of giving aid to the horse show.

 

It was arranged that:

1.

Prizes be given for the following kinds of grain: spring wheat, barley, peas, and oats.

2.

Three prizes be given for each sort, viz., $3, $2, $1.

3.

Potatoes be exhibited in quantities of two bags, prizes same as above.

 

It was resolved that the following judges be invited: Evan McDonald, Arch. Ferguson, John McCorkindale, and M. Sweetnam.

 

Moved by Wm. Black, seconded by John Worthington, that the sum of twelve dollars be given as a special prize for the best general-purpose horse, on condition that he have a stand each week at Aberfoyle, money to be paid last round of season.

 

The meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Hugh Reid, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Tuesday, the 30th ultima, March 1880, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion was the best mode of seeding down land for hay and pasture.  Mr. Alexander Smith being absent, the subject was discussed at some length by Mr. Arkell, Mr. Reid, and others.

 

It was agreed that the offer of Mr. H. R. Kennedy for the shipping of salt and plaster, to deliver at store house, be accepted.  The offer of J. E. McElderry for seed was not accepted.

 

Moved by Allan Stewart, seconded by Donald McKerraker, that the next meeting of this club be held in June to consider whether a Fall Seed Fair or Township Ploughing Match will be of most importance.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Duncan Gilchrist.

 

 

 

 

 

The spring seed fair, under the auspices of the Puslinch Farmers Club, was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on the first day of April 1880.  The attendance was very good, the competition keen on some sorts of grain, there being thirteen entries for oats, John Smith taking first prize, Alex. Smith 2nd, and Robert Beattie 3rd.  For peas, there were five entries, John Eavans taking 1st prize, Alexander McCaig 2nd, William Kerr 3rd.  For barley there were two entries, 1st prize Hugh Stewart, 2nd Alexander McCaig.  For spring wheat there were two entries, Alexander Smith 1st prize, Duncan McFarlane 2nd.  For potatoes, there were six entries, John Eavans 1st prize, Hugh McDiarmid 2nd, John Mulroney 3rd.  Most of the grain exhibited was disposed of. The gentlemen who acted as judges were James Laidlaw, John McCorkindale, Matthew Sweetman, and Mr. Gray.  A show of horses being held in connection with the above fair tended to make the whole a complete success.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 18th day of June 1880, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.  The subject for discussion was the best mode of seeding down land for hay and pasture.  Mr. Alexander Smith read an able essay on the subject, Mr. Glennie, Mr. Reid, Mr. Mahon, and others taking part in the discussion.

 

It was then moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Laing, that the subject for discussion at next meeting be ploughing and the best manner of performing the work for the various purposes, Mr. Glennie to lead.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Mr. Hume, that the seed fair be held in August, the secretary to fix the day, the prizes to be the same as last year.  Carried.  James Laidlaw, John Ramsay, and George Tolton were appointed for judges.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Hugh Reid, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Thursday, the 23rd of September 1880, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion was ploughing and the best manner of performing the work for the various purposes, Mr. Glennie to lead.  Mr. Glennie not being present, the subject was discussed by Mr. Reid, Mr. Gilchrist, Mr. Cockburn, and others.

 

After some discussion on the horse question, it was moved by James Hume, seconded by Donald McKerracher, that Charles Cockburn, James Glennie, Alexander McCaig, and George Hecneau(?), be appointed a committee to organize a company for the purpose of importing a Percheron stallion.  Carried.

 

It was then moved by Charles Cockburn, seconded by James Hume, that the secretary be instructed to invite Mr. Brown of the Agricultural College to address the club at the next meeting.  Carried.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Hugh Reid, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Tuesday the 19th of October 1880, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion was the improvement of grade sheep in view of the British market.  Professor Brown of the Agricultural College gave a very instructive address on the subject and was tendered a cordial vote of thanks by the meeting, after which, it was moved by P. Mahon, seconded by C. Cockburn, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be the relative merits of the Percheron, Clydesdale, or any other breed of horses for farming purposes.  Carried.

 

Moved by C. Cockburn, seconded by James Scott, that C. Cockburn, James Glennie, and P. Mahon be a committee to visit and examine the colts from the German Mills.  The secretary was instructed to write to the editor of the Chicago Livestock Journal for any information that he could give with regard to Percheron Horses.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Hugh Reid, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 19th of November 1880, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Mr. Mahon and Mr. Cockburn gave a report of their visit to the German Mills, which was favourable to the Percheron horse.  Mr. Duff from Erin spoke at considerable length on the merits of the Clydesdale horse, at the close of which a vote was taken on the merits of the different breeds, resulting in favour of the Clydesdale.  It was then agreed that an effort be made to form a company for the purpose of importing a Clydesdale stallion and the following gentlemen were appointed to canvass the township for subscribers to the fund, John Iles, James Hume, Neil Marshall, Allan Stewart, Charles Cockburn, Peter Mahon, Marshall Holms, James McLaren, Alexander Marshall, James M. Stirton, John Clark, Peter McLean, James Glennie, James Anderson, Elijah Eagle, Alexander McAlister, John Thomson, John Carter, Alex McCaig, and James Akins.  A cordial vote of thanks was then tendered to Mr. Duff for the information that he had given.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Hugh Reid, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 24th of December 1880, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Canvassers for the horse fund gave in their report, which was not very encouraging.  After considerable discussion, it was moved by Peter Mahon, seconded by Joseph Smith, that stock books be opened, one for a joint stock company and another for the Duff system.  It was further moved by C. Cockburn, seconded by J. Iles, that P. Mahon, James Glennie, and the secretary be a committee to find out which of the two schemes would be likely to meet with the most support.

 

The annual entertainment was then discussed, when it was moved by James Glennie, seconded by D. Gilchrist, that it be a social.  A committee was then appointed to make the necessary arrangements, consisting of the following gentlemen, Glennie, Mahon, Gilchrist, Worthington, Carter, Iles, Arkell, Jas. Hume, Murray, Kerr, McKerracher, P. McLaren, P. McLean, J. Clark, H. Clark, A. Marshall, Wm. Taylor, Jas. M. Stirton, Allen Stewart, Neil Marshall, H. McDiarmid, John Scott, John Gilchrist, Elijah Eagle, Robt. Little, R. Hammersley, D. McCaig, A. McCaig, Jas. Patterson, Alex. Smith, John Smith, Jos. Smith, Wm. Black, A. McIntyre, C. Cockburn, Jas. Scott, John Smith Jr., R. Buchanan, J. Lennie, John Borthwick, Dennis Mooney, and M. Cassin.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

The committee afterwards met on nomination day and decided to hold the social on the 19th of January 1881.

 

Signed,

Hugh Reid, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held at the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 28th day of January 1881, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

It was then moved by P. Mahon, seconded by Wm. Black, that on account of the returns from ticket sellers being so incomplete, the auditors postpone their examination of the accounts until next meeting.  Carried.

 

The election of officers for the ensuing year was then proceeded with when the following gentlemen were duly elected.

President:

Duncan Gilchrist

Vice-President:

Wm. Black

Secretary-Treasurer:

Wm. Rae

Directors:

Thomas Carter, Henry Arkell, Peter Mahon, Robert Buchanan, James Hume, John Laing, Neil Marshall, Allen Stewart, James Scott, Hugh Reid, James Glennie, Peter Clark, Robert Little, John Smith, Wm. Taylor, C. Cockburn, John Scott.

Auditors:

James Scott and Wm. Kerr

 

It was moved by C. Cockburn, seconded by Jas. Hume, that the secretary be paid the sum of $20 for his services during the past year.  Carried.

 

The subject chosen for discussion at the next meeting is the best system of feeding cattle and the most profitable age to sell them at, James Glennie to lead.

 

A unanimous vote of thanks was passed to the ladies for their valuable assistance in connection with the social.  A vote of thanks was likewise tendered to the retiring President, Mr. Reid, for his able and efficient services during the past year.  Carried, and the meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Duncan Gilchrist, President.

 

 

 

 

The regular meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 18th day of February 1881, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The auditors proceeded with their examination of the accounts, which was reported to the meeting.  It was then moved by Peter Mahon, seconded by Thos. Carter, that the financial statement be received and adopted.  Carried.

 

Mr. Jas. Glennie then gave a very instructive address on the best system of feeding cattle and the most profitable age to sell them at.  A number of other gentlemen also gave their opinions on the subject, after which, a vote of thanks was tendered to Mr. Glennie for his able address.  Carried unanimously.

 

It was then moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Glennie, that Mr. Panton of the Agricultural College be invited to address the club at the next meeting.  Carried.

 

The meeting than adjourned.

 

Signed,

Duncan Gilchrist, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 25th of March 1881, the Vice-President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Mr. Duncan Gilchrist, President, then addressed the meeting, the subject being salt as a fertilizer.  Mr. Gilchrist gave a very good address.  A number of other gentlemen also gave their opinion, recommending the use of salt.

 

It was then moved by Jos. Smith, seconded by John Smith, that the seed fair be held on Friday, the eighth of April and that prizes be given for spring wheat, oats, barley, peas, and potatoes, with three prizes in each class, 1st — $3, 2nd — $2, 3rd — $1, and that the judges be John Hobson, John Ramsay, James Hewer, and James Moffat.

 

The subject for discussion at the next meeting will be fattening cattle as a means to restoring the soil, Mr. Glennie to lead.

 

A unanimous vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Gilchrist for his able address and the meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Duncan Gilchrist, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the eighth day of April 1881, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion was the cost of fattening cattle and how they pay, Mr. Glennie leading the debate.  That gentleman, having bought and fattened quite a number of cattle last winter and having kept a correct account of the feed that they consumed, was able to give us the exact cost of the animals and the price realized when sold, which showed the balance to be on the right sheet.  Mr. Glennie gave a very interesting address and after some discussion, which followed, was tendered a unanimous vote of thanks.

 

It was then moved by Joseph Smith and carried, that James Laidlaw, M.P.P., be invited to speak at the next meeting, he to choose his own subject.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Duncan Gilchrist, President.

 

 

 

 

 

A seed fair under the auspices of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 8th of April 1881, when prizes were given for the following varieties of grain, spring wheat, barley, oats, peas, and potatoes.

 

No. of entries in spring wheat, three,

1st prize — John Atkinson, 2nd — Wm. Kerr, 3rd — Alex. Smith.

 

Barley, eight entries,

1st prize — John Evans, 2nd — James McLaren, 3rd — Alex. Reid.

 

Oats, six entries,

1st prize — Robert Buchanan, 2nd — Wm. Kerr, 3rd — Robt. Buchanan.

 

Peas, four entries,

1st prize — John Eavens, 2nd — James Mason, 3rd — John Atkinson.

 

Potatoes, six entries,

1st prize — James Black, 2nd — Nicholas Norris, 3rd — James Black.

 

There were quite a number of people present and most of the grain changed hands at good prices.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held at the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 17th of June 1881, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Mr. James Laidlaw, M.P.P., addressed the meeting, the subject being  “our position” and duly, Mr. Laidlaw gave a very suitable address.  Mr. Reid followed with some remarks, also, Mr. Glennie, the President, and others.  It was then moved by Hugh Reid, seconded by James Hume, that a vote of thanks be tendered to Mr. Laidlaw for his very instructive address.  Carried unanimously.

 

The arrangements for fall seed are to be left to the secretary.  He was also instructed to invite Mr. Panton of the Agricultural College to address the club at the next meeting.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Duncan Gilchrist, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The adjourned meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 4th of November 1881, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Mr. Panton of the Agricultural College gave a lecture, the subject, science and agriculture.  He was listened to with great attention and at the close was tendered a unanimous vote of thanks.

 

Mr. McLennan was appointed to lead at the next meeting, he to choose his own subject.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Duncan Gilchrist, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 2nd of December 1881, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Mr. McLennan chose for his subject “Should agriculture be taught in our common schools?”.  He spoke at considerable length on that point and then gave a very instructive address on manures and their relative values.  At the close of the address, the speaker was tendered a unanimous vote of thanks, he making a suitable reply.

 

It was then moved by James Hume, seconded by Wm. Black, that we hold a social, as usual.   Carried.  It was moved by Wm. Black, seconded by John Foster, that it be held on Thursday, the 5th of January.  Carried.  A committee was then appointed to make the necessary arrangements consisting of the following gentlemen, Allan McIntyre, John Worthington, John Foster, Pelham Falconbridge, Peter Mahon, Wm. Black, Jos. Smith, Alex Smith, John Smith, Hugh Reid, Charles Cockburn, Hugh Reid Jr., Donald McKerracher, Neil Marshall, James Scott, James Glennie, James Hume, Robert Buchanan, Henry Arkell, John Iles, Wm. Kerr, Martin Cassin, Allen Stewart, Donald Stewart, Robt. Earon, Duncan McGibbon, John Gilchrist, Robt. Little, Alex. McCaig, Martin Cantwell, Robt. Hammersley, Hugh Clark, Peter McLean, and Christopher Little.

 

The social to be held at the Whitmer Steam Boat Hotel.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Duncan Gilchrist, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 27th day of January 1882, the President in the chair.

 

The accounts of the previous year were audited and, on motion, adopted.  Also, the minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.  The following officers were then elected for the current year.

 

President:

Wm. Black

Vice-President:

James Hume

Secretary:

Wm. Rae

Directors:

Duncan Gilchrist, John Iles, Henry Arkell, Peter Mahon, Alex. Smith, John Laing, Neil Marshall, Allen Stewart, James Scott, Hugh Reid, James Glennie, Robt. Little, John Smith, Charles Cockburn, and John Scott.

Auditors:

James Glennie and John Smith

 

It was then moved that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be orchard and garden management, Mr. Gilchrist, nurseryman, to lead.

 

Mr. Gilchrist then left the chair and Mr. Black, the newly elected President, took the same.  Mr. Black thanked the meeting for the honour that they had conferred on him and expressed his confidence in the club as a means of enlightening the farming community on subjects pertaining to their calling.

 

It was then moved by Hugh Reid, seconded by James Hume, that a vote of thanks be tendered the retiring President for his able conduct in the chair.  Carried unanimously.  Mr. Gilchrist made a suitable reply.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Black, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 24th of February 1882, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion was the cultivation of the farmer’s garden, Mr. Gilchrist, nurseryman, leading.  He gave a good, practical address, which it would be well for farmers to put in practice.  At the close of the address, Mr. Gilchrist was tendered a unanimous vote of thanks.

 

It was then moved by Duncan Gilchrist, seconded by Hugh Reid, that the seed fair be held on Friday, the 31st of March and that a meeting of the club be held on the afternoon of the same day.  The prizes to be given for the different kinds of grain will be the same as usual and six bags of potatoes required, in place of two, as in former years.  A special prize of $1 will be given by James Patterson for the best six bags of “Beauty of Hebron” potatoes.  The judges will be Allan Ramsay, Edmond Gray, and James Hewer.

 

The subject for discussion at the next meeting will be fallowing, Mr. John Worthington to lead.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Black, President.

 

 

 

 

 

Te regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 31st of March 1882, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion was summer fallowing, Mr. John Worthington leading the debate.  Mr. Worthington gave a very good, practical discourse on the subject, followed by Mr. Glennie, Mr. Mahon, and Mr. Reid, and others.

 

The subject for discussion at the next meeting will be the prospects of the horse market and the advisability of importing a first-class stallion, Mr. Glennie to lead.  The meeting then adjourned. 

 

Signed,

William Black, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 2nd of June 1882, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion was the advisability of importing a first-class stallion.  The subject being an important one and the meeting not being very largely attended, it was considered better to defer the discussion of the subject until the seed fair meeting when it was expected that there would be a fuller meeting attendance, Mr. Glennie to lead the debate.

 

Arrangements for the seed fair, as to date, were left to the secretary.  Moved by Joseph Smith, seconded by James Glennie, that prizes be given for two varieties of fall wheat, only being red and white, and that four prizes be given for each variety in place of three.  As usual, prizes to be 4th, 3rd, 2nd, 1st.  Mr. Glennie offered one bushel of Democrat wheat for the best sheaf.  Judges will be Ruben Sparks, Evan McDonald, and James Hewer.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Black, President.

 

 

 

 

 

A seed fair under the auspices of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 26th of August 1881*, when prizes were given for the following varieties of fall wheat:

Clawson — $3 — $2 — $1

Any other kind of white — $3 — $2 — $1

Red winter wheat — $3 — $2 — $1

Two bushels of any variety — $2

 

Fall seed fair held Friday, 25th of August 1882.

Prizes given for the following varieties of fall wheat:

White winter wheat — $4 — $3 — $2 — $1

Red winter wheat — $4 — $3 — $2 — $1

One bushel of Democrat wheat given by James Glennie for the best sheaf of fall wheat.

 

* — The secretary, Mr. William Rae, seems to have included the prize structure for the fall seed fair for the years 1881 and the current year, 1882, possibly to illustrate clearly the change in prizes.

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 27th of October 1882, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion was the advisability of importing a first-class Clydesdale stallion.  Mr. James Glennie opened the subject by offering to bring in a first-class horse if the township would promise eighty mares.  The offer was highly satisfactory to the meeting and a committee was appointed to canvass the township, consisting of the following gentlemen, Wm. Black, Joseph Smith, Duncan Gilchrist, William Kerr, William Rae, James Hume, Peter McLean, John Clark, A. Foley, Alex. Marshall, Frank Mast, Neil Marshall, Allen Stewart, Donald Ferguson, Arch. McAlister, Robt. Little, Alex. McCaig, James Patterson, John Carter, John Mulrooney, Pat Moran, James Steel? and James Glennie.

 

The subject chosen for discussion at the next meeting was “The township show, would it benefit it to make certain changes in the system of management?”, Wm. Rae to lead.  Canvassers on the horse question are to hand in their report at said meeting, the meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Black, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held at Mr. Singular’s Hotel, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 24th of November 1882, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion being the township show, Wm. Rae opened the debate by some remarks on having the show open for other townships to compete and on the question of charging at the gate on show day, followed by Mr. Smith, Mr. McLean, Mr. McCaig, and others.

 

The Glennie horse scheme, mentioned in the previous minutes, was dropped at the request of Mr. Peter Beaver, and a scheme by that gentleman canvassed, with the canvassers to report at the meeting on the 24th.  They, not being all present, it was agreed to leave it open until the next meeting.

 

The subject for discussion at the next meeting will be the most profitable kind of pigs and the best method of feeding them, Robert Douglas to lead.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Black, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 15th of December 1882, the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion being the most profitable kind of pigs and the best method of feeding them, Mr. Robert Douglas opened the debate by giving his experience with pigs in the old country and concluded by recommending the Berkshire as the best pigs for all purposes.  Mr. Douglas was listened to with great attention and at the close was tendered a unanimous vote of thanks.

 

It was then moved by Mr. Glennie, seconded by Mr. Arkell, that there be an annual social held, as usual.  It was moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. Glennie, that it be held on the 17th of January 1883.  Carried.  The following gentlemen were then appointed a committee to make the necessary arrangements, Allen McIntyre, John Worthington, John Foster, James Patterson, Peter Beaver, Christopher McBeth, J. T. Scott, P. Mahon, Wm. Black, Jos. Smith, Alex. Smith, Hugh Reid, Neil Marshall, James Scott, Jas. Glennie, Jas. Hume, Henry Arkell, John Iles, Wm. Kerr, Martin Cassin, Allen Stewart, John Gilchrist, Robt. Little, Alex. McCaig, Robt. Hammersley, Peter McLean, Christopher Little.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

William Black, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Singular’s Hotel, on Tuesday, the 30th of January 1883, at 7 o’ clock p.m., the President in the chair.  The minutes of the previous monthly meeting were read and confirmed.  Also, the accounts for the previous year were audited and found correct and, on motion, adopted.

 

The following officers were then elected for the current year, viz.

President:

James Hume

Vice-President:

Jos. Smith

Secretary-Treasurer, elected by ballet

William Black

Directors:

William Rae, Duncan Gilchrist, John Iles, James H. Glennie, John Smith, Henry Arkell, William Kerr, Donald McKarcher, and Alexander Watt.

Auditors:

J. H. Glennie and William Rae

 

It was then agreed that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be the planting of shade trees, Mr. Rae to lead.  On motion, the retiring President left the chair and Mr. Hume took the same.  Mr. Hume thanked the meeting for the honour conferred upon him when a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered to the retiring President, which was suitably responded to.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Hume, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, 23rd of February 1883, at 7 o’ clock p.m., the President in the chair.

 

The subject for discussion being the planting of shade trees, in the absence of Mr. Rae, the discussion was opened by Mr. Mahon and followed by Messrs. Gilchrist, Patterson, Norrish, and others.

 

It was then moved by Duncan Gilchrist, seconded by Peter Mahon, that, owing to the absence of Mr. Rae, the same subject should be re-discussed at the next meeting, Mr. Rae to lead.

 

It was moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. James Patterson, that the spring seed fair be held on Friday, the 6th of April.  Carried.  Moved by Mr. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Mahon, that the prize list be the same as last spring, namely:

 

1st

2nd

3rd

 

Spring wheat

$3

$2

$1

 

Barley

$3

$2

$1

 

Oats

$3

$2

$1

 

Peas

$3

$2

$1

 

Potatoes

$3

$2

$1

 

 

The samples of grain are to consist of 10 bushels and 6 bags of potatoes.  Carried.  The following gentlemen were appointed judges, Duncan Gillies, William Hortop, and Robert Kirby.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Hume, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 20th of April 1883, at 7 o’ clock p.m.  The President in the chair, the minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject for discussion being the planting of shade trees was opened by Mr. Rae reading a very able and interesting essay on the subject and pointed out to farmers the great benefits to be derived from the planting of trees, after which, there followed a very lively discussion between Messrs. Glennie, James McLean, Patterson, and others.

 

It was then moved by Mr. Rae, seconded by Mr. Patterson, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be “public and farm roads, how should they be made and repaired?”, Mr. Glennie to lead.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Hume, President.

 

 

 

 

 

November 9th 1883:

 

Mr. William Black, Secretary-Treasurer to the Puslinch Farmers Club handed in his resignation, per letter to the President, feeling unable to occupy the position any longer on account of ill health, moved by Mr. Hugh Reid, seconded by Mr. James Glennie, that the same be accepted.  Carried.

 

Proposed by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. John A. Smith, that Charles Kilner act as secretary during the balance of this year on account of Mr. William Black being incapacitated through illness.

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 9th day of November, at 7 o’ clock.  The President in the chair, the minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject under discussion being “public and farm roads, how they should be made and repaired, the discussion was opened by Mr. James Glennie, speaking in a very able and interesting manner on the subject, pointing out and illustrating to farmers, the great benefits to be derived by the proper maintenance of concession and sideroads.  Upon Mr. Glennie resuming his seat, the discussion was afterwards ably taken up by Messrs. D. Gilchrist, Wm. Rae, N. Norrish, H. Reid, J. Smith, and others.

 

Moved by Mr. H. Reid, seconded by Mr. W. Rae, that a vote of thanks be tendered Mr. James Glennie for his able and interesting essay on public and farm roads.  Mr. Glennie tendered his sincere thanks to the members assembled for their courtesy and attention.

 

Moved by Mr. H. Reid, seconded by Mr. J. Glennie, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be that the subject of “public and farm roads” be enlarged upon, Mr. C. Kilner to read an essay on the above subject.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

James Hume, President.

 

 

 

 

 

December 14th 1883:

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 14th instant, at 7 o’ clock p.m.  The President in the chair, the minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The subject under discussion being public and farm roads, enlarged upon from last meeting, how they should be maintained and repaired.  The discussion was opened by the secretary, choosing for his subject, the system as carried out in a small township in England, during his residence there, and of which he was deputy overseer, also advocating in this township, hired labour versus statute labour.  Upon the secretary resuming his seat, the discussion was taken up by Mr. H. Reid, Mr. D. Gilchrist, Mr. Joseph Smith, Mr. John Smith, and others.

 

Moved by Mr. H. Reid, seconded by Mr. D. Gilchrist, that a vote of thanks be tendered the secretary for his able essay.  The secretary briefly replied, tendering his thanks.

 

Moved by Mr. John Foster, seconded by Mr. D. Gilchrist, that the annual social dance be held on Wednesday, the sixteenth day of January in the year of our Lord, eighteen hundred and eighty-four and appointed the following gentlemen to act as a committee, namely: Messrs. Allan McIntyre, John Worthington, John Foster, James Patterson, Peter Beaver, Christopher McBeath, J. T. Scott, Peter Mahon, Wm. Black, Joseph Smith, Alexander Smith, Hugh Reid, Neil Marshall, James Scott, James Glennie, James Hume, Henry Arkell, John Iles, Wm. Rae, Duncan McFarlane, Wm. Kerr, D. Woods, Alexander Stuart, John Gilchrist, R. Little, Alexander McCaig, Robert Hammersley, Peter McLean (councillor), Christopher Little, D. McKerecher, John A. Smith, R. Buchanan, John Scott, Duncan Gilchrist, John McFarlane, Archibald Marshall, and Dan McFarlane.

 

Moved by Mr. H. Reid, seconded by Mr. Joseph Smith, that the committee meet on the municipal nomination day, after the nominations are over, to make final arrangements for the annual social to be held on Wednesday the 14th of January 1884.  The meeting then adjourned to meet on Monday the 31st day of December 1883.

 

Signed,

James Hume, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, February 8th 1884, at 7 p.m.  When the Secretary-Treasurer handed in his annual report, Messrs. Glennie and Rae examined the secretary’s receipt and expenditure accounts and endorsed them with their signatures, having found them correct.  Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. D. Gilchrist, that the Secretary-Treasurer’s report be adopted.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. D. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Wm. Rae, that the sum of two dollars be paid to Mr. A. Campbell for his services as piper at the recent annual reunion held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Wednesday January the 16th 1884.

 

Moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. Reid, that Mr. Joseph Smith be elected President of the Puslinch Farmers Club for the ensuing year.  Carried unanimously.

 

Moved by Mr. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Glennie, that Mr. John A. Smith be elected as Vice-President of the club for the ensuing year.  Carried unanimously.

 

Moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. John A. Smith, that the retiring Secretary-Treasurer be re-elected for the ensuing year.  Carried.

 

The following gentlemen were then appointed to act as a Board of Directors, namely, Messrs. Duncan Gilchrist, Hugh Reid, William Rae, James Glennie, John Foster, Donald McKerecher, John Iles, and James Hume.

 

Moved by Mr. D. McKerecher, seconded by Mr. John A. Smith, that Messrs. Glennie and Rae be appointed auditors for the ensuing year.  Carried

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Foster, that a vote of thanks be tendered the retiring President, Mr. James Hume, for the courteous and able manner in which he has discharged his duties during his term of office as President of this club.

 

Mr. Hume, upon relinquishing his office, thanked the members present for their kind attendance, attention, and assistance on the subjects of discussion at the monthly meetings that he had the honour of presiding over during the past year.

 

Upon the retiring President vacating the President’s chair, the Vice-President occupied the chair during the remaining part of the evening, in the absence of the President.

 

The secretary produced a letter from the secretary of the Dover and Raleigh Farmers Club respecting sheep-worrying dogs, referred to a future meeting.

 

Moved by D. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Hume, that the subject under discussion at the next monthly meeting be the breeding and most suitable breed of sheep for this country, Mr. Glennie to open the discussion.  Meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

John A. Smith, Vice-President.

 

 

 

 

 

March 14th 1884.

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, March 14th 1884, at 7 p.m., the President in the chair, when the minutes of the last meeting were read by the Secretary and adopted.

 

The subject under discussion being the breeding and most suitable breed of sheep for this country, the discussion was opened by Mr. James Glennie reading an extensive and interesting essay on the black-faced classes of sheep suitable for exportation to the British markets, where there is an unlimited demand for shearling whethers (?), weighing from 140 to 150 lbs. live weight, and stating from inquiries made during his recent visit to England, that the black-faced classes of sheep realized from 1 to 3 cents per pound more in the carcass than the strong-woolled and white-faced classes of sheep did.  Afterwards, the discussion was taken up by Mr. Alexander Smith and Charles Kilner.  Moved by Mr. Alexander Smith, seconded by Mr. John Foster that a vote of thanks be tendered Mr. Glennie for his able essay on the most suitable breed of sheep for this country.  Mr. Glennie briefly replied, thanking the members present for the attention and interest manifested during the period of time that he was reading his essay.

 

Moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. A. Smith, that the annual spring seed fair be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Tuesday, April the 1st 1884, the prizes to be as follows, classes of grain to be exhibited, the same as last year, namely, spring wheat, barley, oats, peas, and potatoes.  The first prize in each class is to be $2, the second prize, $1.50, and the third prize, $1.  Each exhibitor is to pay an entrance fee of 25 cents in addition to a member’s fee.

 

The meeting then adjourned, to meet in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on the afternoon of Tuesday April 1st 1884.

 

Signed,

Alex Smith, ex officio Chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

August 11th 1884.

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Monday evening, August 11th 1884, at 8 p.m., when the minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Proposed by Mr. John Foster, seconded by Mr. D. Gilchrist, that Mr. Alex. Smith take the chair and act as ex officio chairman, in the absence of the President.

 

Moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. Gilchrist, that the annual fall seed fair be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Thursday, the 28th day of August 1884.  Classes of grain to be exhibited are to be the same as last year, and the prizes to be as follows, namely, for white and red winter wheat, 1st prize in each class — $4, 2nd prize — $3, 3rd prize — $2, 4th prize — $1, with each exhibitor to pay an entrance fee of 25 cents in addition to member’s fees.  Non-members are to pay an entrance fee of 50 cents.  It was moved that the following gentlemen be requested to act as judges, Mr. M. Sweetnam, Mr. Wm. Hortop, and Mr. Charles Calfass.

 

Moved by Mr. D. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. John A. Smith, that the discussion at the next meeting be the best method of fall ploughing, Mr. Joseph Smith to open the discussion.  Also, it was moved that a day be appointed to hold the ploughing match in connection with the above club, when liberal prizes will be offered to competitors.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith, Chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

September 5th 1884.

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, September 5th, at 8 p.m., when the minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed, the President in the chair.

 

The subject under discussion being the best method of fall ploughing, the discussion was opened by Mr. Joseph Smith, the President, advocating no special style of ploughing, urging that all farmers should plough early in the fall to enable farmers to plough down obnoxious weeds before the seeds get thoroughly ripened and spread over the land, stating that in his experience that late fall ploughing was not a safeguard to destroy weeds.  Afterwards, the discussion was taken up by Mr. Duncan Gilchrist, advocating deep ploughing so as to enable the frost to shake and pulverize the land.  Mr. James Hume preferred double ploughing in the fall, first to plough early after harvest and then late in the fall.  Mr. Neil Marshall also preferred the system of ploughing twice in the fall.  Mr. John Gilchrist endorsed the remarks of the previous speakers, stating also as his opinion that there was no systematic plough that could be upheld as a general rule.

 

Moved by Mr. Duncan Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Neil Marshall, that the contemplated ploughing match be deferred until the Puslinch Agricultural Show ahead, and that the President and Vice-President be authorized to canvass for subscriptions.

 

Moved by Mr. Smith, seconded by Mr. Duncan Gilchrist, that the discussion at the next meeting be the best system of rotation of crops, Mr. John Gilchrist to lead.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith, Chairman.

 

 

 

 

 

November 28th 1884.

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, November 28th, at 8 p.m., when the minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted, the President in the chair.

 

The subject under discussion at this meeting being the best system of rotation of crops, the discussion was opened by Mr. John Gilchrist.  The speaker opened his discussion by alluding to the early settlement of this country being farmed in a very over-productive style by cropping one class of grain until the soil lost its natural strength to raise one class of grain only, stating his idea that the present system of utilizing and farming the land as now practised growing different crops such as wheat, barley, oats, peas, hay, and roots, would be followed for some time.  Mr. Gilchrist’s system was to adopt a nine years course, first — turnips, second — barley, third and fourth — clover hay, first year pasturing, second year mowing for hay, then ploughing the clover stubble down and working the land well, fifth crop — fall wheat, then a crop of peas, then a crop of oats, and then a good fallowing down.

 

Afterwards, Mr. Joseph Smith took up the discussion, stating that farmers did not sufficiently study the nature of the soils that they had under their management, that they often cropped their land less judiciously than they should.

 

Mr. Kilner in his remarks adopted the five years system, rotating his crops as follows, first — turnips, after, thoroughly clearing and working the land, also manuring as heavily as possible with barnyard manure, then barley on light loamy soil, then sowing down clover and timothy, cutting the first year and pasturing the second, then fall wheat in the clover stubble.

 

Moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. John Smith that a vote of thanks be tendered Mr. Gilchrist for his able essay.  Mr. Gilchrist thanked those present for the attention and interest manifested during the period he occupied in addressing them.

 

Moved by Mr. Kilner, seconded by Mr. Foster, that the subject under discussion at the next meeting be the most profitable system of fattening cattle, Mr. Wm. Rae to lead.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

The monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Monday evening, December 22nd 1884, at 8 p.m., when the minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted, the President being in the chair.

 

The subject under discussion at this meeting was the most profitable and cheapest method of feeding cattle, Mr. Wm. Rae to lead.  In the absence of Mr. Rae, the discussion was opened by Mr. Mahon, prefacing his address by stating that in some counties outside the county of Wellington, taking for instance the county of Middlesex, they wintered their cattle over in good condition and shipped them away during the summer months after being well fed upon rich and nutritive grass, and where a rich and nutritive and luxurious grass could be had, that, he thought was the most profitable way of bringing young stock to early and ripe maturity.

 

In the county of Wellington, many or almost all farmers had to depend on fattening their stock during the winter months.  Mr. Mahon stated that he could not define any special system of winter-feeding cattle as more profitable and economical than any other way.  Although he had not fed many, still he was thoroughly convinced that farmers had not given serious consideration as to the quality of cattle that they raised. Unless they bred cattle from purebred sires, it was an impossibility to fatten cattle for the English market and realize a remunerative profit.  Mr, Mahon suggested that the above subject be brought up at a future meeting again, requesting that Mr. Rae prepare an essay.

 

Afterwards, the discussion was taken up by Mr. Kilner, who advocated giving good attention to young cattle in their first and second year and keeping them on as good pasture as possibly could be procured for them. He also advocated putting them in the stalls early in the fall and feeding them meal and bran nights and mornings in small quantities, and at the commencement of winter, to feed steady on turnips, meal, and bran, and also a small quantity of clover hay twice per day.

 

Mr. Joseph Smith endorsed the remarks of the previous speakers, also stating that he did not approve of feeding much meal when cattle were first placed in their feeding stalls.  By degrees, he enlarged their allowance of meal.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. James Black, that this discussion be laid over to another meeting, Mr. Rae requested to lead as per resolution.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. John Foster, seconded by Mr. Frances Smith, that the annual reunion be held, as in former years, on Wednesday evening, January the 21st 1885, in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, and that the following gentlemen be asked to act as a committee of management: Messrs. Allan McIntyre, Jackson Worthington, John Foster, Peter Mahon, Murray Hibbard (?), Donald McCaig, Wm. Black, Joseph Smith, Alexander Smith Jr., Hugh Reid, Neil Marshall, James Scott, James H. Glennie, James Hume, John Iles, Wm. Rae, Wm. Kerr, Peter Black, John Grant, Allan Stuart, John Gilchrist, Joseph Little, Robert Hammersley, Peter McLean, Christopher Little, John A. Smith, Duncan Gilchrist, Archibald Marshall, James Black, Robert Bell, and Herbert Hammersley.  Resolved, that the members of the committee be requested to attend a meeting to be held on the municipal nomination day, to make arrangements for the annual social.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith, President.

 

 

 

 

 

A special meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Monday, December 29th 1884, at 4 p.m., at the close of the municipal nominations.

 

Moved by Mr. James Hume, seconded by Mr. Foster that the annual social of the Puslinch Farmers Club be held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Tuesday, the 20th day of January 1885 instead of Wednesday January 21st as previously arranged at the regular monthly meeting, and that the following ladies and gentlemen be solicited to assist in the evening’s entertainment: Miss Galbraith, Miss Scott, Mrs. Cross, James Innes, Esq. M.P., James Laidlaw, Esq., M.P.P., Professor Brown, Mr. Mills, D. Guthrie, Mr. Johnson, Toronto, Dr. McPhatter, D. Stirton, The President of the Farmers Club, Nichol Township, R. Dredge, Eden Mills, J. R. Maitland, Guelph, Duncan McKenzie, J. H. Glennie, Archibald Marshall, James Vollacks (?), Mr. Morkin (?), Crief P.O.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Neil Marshall, that Mr. Christopher Little, Mr. Jackson Worthington, the President, and Secretary, be a committee to wait upon the Guelph vocalists and to make arrangements to convey them from Guelph to Aberfoyle and back.

 

Committee meeting to be held in Aberfoyle on the 13th of January, at 7 p.m.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith, President.

 

 

 

 

 

January 30th 1885.

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, January the 30th 1885, at 8 p.m., when the minutes of the last regular meeting were read and adopted, the President in the chair.

 

At the opening of the meeting the Secretary read a letter from Mr. Stubbs of Bosworth requesting information respecting the formation of a farmers club.  Also, the Secretary informed the members present that he had answered Mr. Stubb’s letter and had furnished the gentleman with the constitution, rules, and by-laws of the Puslinch Farmers Club.  The Secretary also read a letter from the Secretary of the Thames Farmers Club respecting the sheep and dog act.  Moved by Mr. P. Mahon, seconded by Mr. John A. Smith, that the Secretary answer the last mentioned letter.

 

Afterwards, the Secretary-Treasurer laid before the meeting his annual report.  Moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. H. Doughty, that Mr. P. Mahon and Mr. John A. Smith be appointed auditors in the absence of the two gentlemen officially appointed at the last annual meeting, to examine the Secretary’s accounts.  Upon the auditors reporting the Secretary’s accounts as being found correct, it was moved by Mr. J. Grant, seconded by Mr. J. Foster that the auditors report be adopted.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Hammersley, that the retiring Vice-President, Mr. John A. Smith, be elected President for the ensuing year.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. Mahon, that Mr. Henry Arkell be elected as Vice-President for the ensuing year.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. H. Doughty, seconded by Mr. Grant, that the retiring Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. C. Kilner, be re-elected Secretary-Treasure for the ensuing year.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. John A. Smith, that the following gentlemen be elected on the Board of Management as Directors for the ensuing year: Duncan Gilchrist, Hugh Reid, Wm. Rae, James H. Glennie, Robert Buchanan, John Foster, Alexander Marshall, John Gilchrist, Allan Stewart, Joseph Little, and Peter Mahon.

 

Moved by Mr. John A. Smith, seconded by Mr. Foster, that Mr. Joseph Smith and Mr. John Worthington be elected as auditors for the ensuing year.

 

Moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. Doughty, that a vote of thanks be tendered to the retiring President for the able and courteous manner in which he has presided over the meetings during the past year.  Mr. Joseph Smith thanked the members present for the hearty vote of thanks just tendered to him and trusted that the club would still prosper and flourish in the future and always remain a credit to the Puslinch agricultural community.

 

Moved by Mr. Mahon, seconded by Mr. Renlik, that the retiring President vacate the chair and that the newly appointed chairman take the chair.

 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. Mahon, that the sum of one dollar and fifty cents be paid to the caretaker of the hall for lighting the fires in the council chambers on the evenings of the regular monthly meetings in connection with this club.  Carried.

 

Signed,

John A. Smith, President.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Monday evening, March 2nd 1885, at 7:30 p.m., when the minutes of the annual meeting of the club were read and confirmed, the President in the chair.

 

The subject under discussion this evening being the cheapest and most profitable way of fattening cattle.  In the absence of Mr. Wm. Rae, who was expected to open the discussion, the President called upon Mr. Duncan Gilchrist to open the discussion.  Mr. Gilchrist, in opening his address, said that to feed an animal intended for beef, it should be well attended to from a calf.  He believed that it was better to keep an animal until it was three years old rather than to force it off at an earlier age.  He could not see how the ordinary farmer could attain a profit by fattening cattle upon what is now termed the scientific system of fattening stock either by steaming, boiling, or drying their feed.  He thought that the extra labour and cost in manufacturing such feed would deprive the farmer of any profit whatever.  His plan was to feed his cattle after they were placed in their feeding stalls, 3 gallons of ground meal each, three times per day, each, one bushel of turnips or other roots, also hay and straw mixed.  He preferred raising his own stock in preference to buying in stock, as he had tried both ways and he was now well satisfied that his own stock realized a larger per cent of profit.

 

Afterwards, the discussion was taken up by Mr. Joseph Little.  His system was to attend well to his cattle from there being a calf until they were fit for the butcher.  He had tried the forcing system but found it too expensive.  He now endeavoured to keep them in a growing condition until they were over two years.  His system of fattening was similar to Mr. Gilchrist’s only he fed only ½ gallon of meal instead of a gallon.

 

Mr. Reid then addressed the meeting and said that he had always realized the best returns from his cattle by fattening in the summer months.  He generally fed off his cattle as soon as his clover was fit to turn into for pasture, and in the course of six weeks, by giving them a little meal, twice a day, his cattle were ready for the butcher.  Mr. Reid had paid more attention to fattening hogs than cattle and maintained that there was more profit in them than in cattle.

 

Mr. Joseph Smith fed ½ gallon of meal with hay and roots, three times per day to his cattle and said that there was no profit in feeding more meal than what he fed, as he found that cattle whose stomachs were overloaded with meal became very restless and did not appear to improve in condition.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Joseph Smith, that there be a spring seed fair held as in former years.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. D. Gilchrist, seconded by Mr. Hume, that a seed fair be held in the fall instead of the spring.  Lost.

 

Moved by Mr. Alex. Marshall, seconded by Mr. John Foster, that the spring fair be held on Friday, the 20th of march 1885.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. Hume, that the prize list be the same as last year.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Hume, seconded by Mr. Little, that members pay an entrance fee of 25 cents, non-members 50 cents.

 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. Hume, that Dr. Greenside, V.S. be invited to give a lecture, at his own convenience and also to choose his own subject.  It was also moved that the secretary communicate with Dr. Greenside immediately.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

John A. Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual spring seed fair was held at the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday, the 20th of March 1885, when there was a large show of grain offered for sale and exchange, considering the bad state of the roads.  The classes of grain competing for prizes, namely, spring wheat, barley, peas, and potatoes, were all of good quality and well cleaned.  Oats were not as well cleaned and free from other kinds of grain as they might have been.  The following gentlemen officiated as judges, R. Irving, Nassagaweya, Henry Gray, Beverly, and P. Mahon, Puslinch.

 

Signed,

John A. Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual fall wheat fair was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Monday, August 31st 1885.  There was a large class of fall wheat, red and white, offered for competition, all of it being well cleaned and suitable for seed purposes.  The judges remarked that they had not seen as good a display of fall wheat for some years, considering the wet season during the harvest month.  The following gentlemen officiated as judges, Messrs. James Laidlaw of Guelph, James McLaren of Puslinch, and Frank Conway of Aberfoyle.

 

Signed,

John A. Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

A lecture was given in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, October 23rd 1885, by Dr. Greenside, V.S., choosing for his subject, causes of disease among farm animals.  The lecturer prefaced his remarks by advising the members of the club to urge their brother farmers to uphold the club, and not to let it flag and die away, as the benefits of farmers clubs were, in his opinion, very beneficial to the farming community.  He also remarked during the evening a grant might be obtained from the local legislature to assist in paying the expenses of a professional agricultural lecturer, should the club at any time deem it advisable to secure the services of any prominent agricultural lecturer.

 

Dr. Greenside said that it was of great importance that farmers should know more of the causes of diseases of animals, more so than the cure, as prevention was better than the cure of the disease.

 

The doctor then spoke on the disease of abortion among cows, stating that abortion was considered by competent authorities to be of two natures, one sympathetic, the other contagious.  Up to the present time no permanent cure had been discovered for it although the United States government had spent several thousand dollars to discover a cure. The doctor’s theory was that as soon as a farmer had a cow slip her calf she should be separated immediately from the rest of the herd, as he had in his experience noted that where cows were kept together after an abortion had taken place, then the disease had gone through the whole herd.  The lecturer then treated the disease known as hog cholera, stating that in the districts where hog cholera was prevalent in Ontario that had the farmers been more cleanly in the manner of stabling their hogs and also more careful as regards the food fed to them, then this disease would not have obtained such a foothold, as it did.  He advocated the killing of all hogs so affected as the best means of stamping out the disease, as when a hog once had the disease there was not time to try medical remedies to cure it, as a few hours only intervened from the time the disease is noticed until death takes place.

 

The lecturer then passed on to accidental diseases of animals and their digestive organs.  In speaking of the horse, in his experience, he had often come across cases of colic, which by a little forethought and better management of the owner of the animal or person in whose charge the horse was, heavy expenses might have been saved, and also the life of the horse.  Farmers could not be too particular in looking personally after the feeding and grooming of their horses, especially during the winter months when horses as a rule do not have much work to do.  Then their feed should be diminished from the amount that they were fed during the summer months.  Also, never overfeed a horse with dry oats previous to his going on a long journey.  During the winter months, a bran mash was an excellent food once or twice a week as a laxative, but not to be given the night previous to a long day’s drive.  Do not feed a horse dry bran with his oats as bran had the tendency of clogging up a horse’s stomach and interfering with his digestive organs.  He advocated rough, crushed oats mixed with a little cut hay as the best digestive food for a horse not in regular work.  A horse should not be fed more than nine pounds of hay per day and about the same weight of grain.  After the doctor had brought his lecture to a close, he was asked several questions by gentlemen present that he readily answered.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Joseph Smith, that a vote of thanks be tendered to Dr. Greenside for his able and interesting lecture, which was unanimously carried, which upon being tendered to the doctor by Alexander Smith, Esq., chairman of the evening, the doctor thanked those present for their kind and patient attention to him during the evening.

 

Signed,

John A. Smith

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Monday evening, November 30th 1885, when the minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted, the President in the chair.

 

The subject under discussion this evening was butter-making, which is best, the deep or shallow system of raising cream.  In the absence of Mr. Thos. Weir, who was expected to lead, the secretary read an essay advocating the shallow system of rising cream as the better of the two, having tried both plans. 

 

Afterwards, the discussion was taken up by Mr. Reid stating that he had not kept any cows this summer, but receiving milk from his neighbour who adopted the deep setting system, he found that the milk that he obtained was very rich and quite a quantity of cream appeared on the dish in which the milk was set away in.

 

Mr. Joseph Smith also advocated the shallow system.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Foster, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be laws of health and animal growth, Mr. John A. Smith to lead.

 

Moved by Mr. John Foster, seconded by Mr. Reid, that there be an annual reunion held during the month of January 1886, as in former years.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Joseph Smith, that the President, the Secretary, and Mr. John Foster be a committee to wait upon the Guelph Gentleman’s Dramatic Society, to invite them to give an entertainment at the annual reunion and to report at the next meeting.

 

Signed,

John Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, December 18th 1885, when the minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted, the President in the chair.

 

The subject under discussion this evening is the “laws of nature and animal growth”, the President to lead.  The President opened his address stating that the above subject was one of great importance, that he was sorry that it had fallen to his lot to open the discussion as he thought that had some of the older members been present, they would have handled the subject far better than he could, and the young men who were present in the room would have gathered some valuable information which would no doubt prove useful to them in the future when they were working farms on their own account, as he hoped to see them all farmers at some future day.

 

He believed the best system to stimulate the growth of animals, especially the young was to give free exercise during the winter months when the weather was favourable, to feed clean and wholesome food, not less than three times per day, and oftener if you have time.  He feeds four and five times per day giving small quantities at a time so that all food may be consumed by his cattle, and none wasted.  His cattle are allowed extra hay in preference to straw when they are tied up in their stalls.  Great care should be exercised during the hay and grain harvest so that none should be stored away in a damp or unripe condition as there were no animals of any class that could attain their natural growth if they were fed their first and second winters on food that had been stored away for them that had been improperly harvested and musty feed had better be turned out to rot as it would rather than be fed to young animals as it was bad for creating colic.  When young animals were subject to any sickness, they often got stunted in their growth.

 

The discussion was afterward taken up by Mr. Foster and Mr. Kilner.

 

Moved by John Foster, seconded by Mr. Doughty, that the annual reunion be held on Wednesday evening, January 20th 1886, admission to concert and dramatic entertainment, 25 cents each, ladies free.

 

Moved and seconded that the following gentlemen be on the working committee, Mr. H. Reid, John Foster, H. Doughty, James Scott, R. Bell, John Grant, G. & F. Frazer.

 

Moved that the following ladies and gentlemen be invited to assist at the concert, Miss Cross, Miss Mamie Thornton, Mr. & Mrs. McCaig, Mr. James Vollick, Mr. S. Duffield, Junior, Mr. Kennedy, Toronto, R. & J. Brown, Campbellville, James Innes, Esq., M.P., James Laidlaw, Esq., M.P.P.

 

Moved that Mr. H. Reid and Mr. C. Cockburn be a committee to procure an organ.

 

Signed,

John A. Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Wednesday evening, February 17th 1886, at 7:30 p.m., when the minutes of the last regular meeting were read and adopted, the President in the chair.

 

This meeting being the annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club, the Secretary for the year just past laid upon the table his financial accounts which were audited by Mr. Hugh Reid and Mr. Henry Doughty, in the absence of the two auditors duly elected at the annual meeting held in the year of our Lord 1885.  The auditors of the evening duly examined the Secretary-Treasurer’s accounts and comparing them with the vouchers in his care, found them to be correct.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Doughty, that on account of the stormy evening and the scarcity of members present that the election of officers for the ensuing year be postponed until the March monthly meeting.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Reid, seconded by Mr. Kilner, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be the best method of breeding and improving stock, Mr. Reid to lead.  Carried.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual spring seed fair of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Monday, April 13th 1886, when there was a good display of all kinds of spring seed grain, exhibited for sale and exchange.  The following gentlemen kindly officiated as judges, Mr. James Taylor of Mosboro, Mr. R. Sims of Beverly, and Mr. Neil Marshall of Puslinch.

 

On account of the scarcity of members present at the annual meeting of this club, held on Wednesday evening, February 17th, also at the regular monthly meeting held on Friday evening, March 20th 1886, on account of the stormy weather each evening, it was resolved on Friday March the 20th to elect the officers of the club for the ensuing year, should the club be sustained at the annual spring seed fair.  During the time that the judges were inspecting the different classes of grain in the hall, the President for the past year called the members together in the council chamber, when officers of the club were elected for the ensuing year.

 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. James Patterson, that the Puslinch Farmers Club be sustained for the ensuing year.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. Duncan McFarlane, that Mr. James Blair be President of this club for the ensuing year.  Carried.

 

Moved, in amendment, by Mr. James Blair, seconded by Mr. James Mason, that Mr. Alexander Watt be President of the club for the ensuing year.  Lost.

 

Moved, in amendment to the amendment, by Mr. R. Douglas, seconded by Mr. James Patterson, that Mr. Alexander McCaig be President of this club for the ensuing year.  Lost.

 

Moved by Mr. James Patterson, seconded by Mr. Alexander Smith, that Mr. Hugh McDiarmid be the Vice-President of this club for the ensuing year.  Carried.

 

Moved, in amendment, by Mr. Duncan McFarlane, seconded by Mr. C. Kilner, that mr. John Worthington be the Vice-President for the ensuing year.  Lost.

 

Moved, in amendment to the amendment, by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. H. McDiarmid, that Mr. Nicholas Norrish be Vice-President for the ensuing year.  Lost.

 

Moved by Mr. John Worthington, seconded by Mr. R. Douglas, that Mr. C. Kilner be the Secretary-Treasurer for the ensuing year.  Carried.

 

Moved, in amendment, by Mr. C. Kilner, seconded by Mr. James Blair, that Mr. Alexander Smith be the Secretary-Treasurer for the ensuing year.

 

Moved, in amendment to the amendment, by Mr. Alexander Smith, seconded by Mr. J. Smith, that Mr. Herbert Hammersley be the Secretary-Treasurer for the ensuing year.

 

Moved by Mr. D. McFarlane, seconded by Mr. James Mason, that the following gentlemen be nominated as a Board of Directors, Messrs. Duncan Gilchrist, Hugh Reid, Wm. Rae, John A. Smith, John Worthington, John Foster, Joseph Smith, Andrew Monroe, Alexander McCaig, Joseph Little, and James Patterson.

 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. James Black, that Messrs. George Sparks and Alexander Watt be the auditors for the ensuing year.

 

Move by Mr. George Atkinson, seconded by Mr. John Worthington, that a vote of thanks be tendered the retiring President for the able manner in which he has discharged the duties of his office for the past year.  The retiring President, on vacating the chair, welcomed his successor on the honour that had been conferred upon him, as he thought it was a good plan to install young and new members as office bearers, causing keener interests on behalf of the club, as it was his candid opinion that institutes of this description were beneficial to the agricultural community.  He sincerely wished to return his sincere thanks for the vote of thanks tendered to him, and whilst the club was in existence, he should always be willing to do whatever he could for the benefit of it.

 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. D. McFarlane, that the prizes awarded to the different classes of grain this spring be the same as last year, namely, the first prize in each class, two dollars, the second prize, one dollar and fifty cents, and the third prize, one dollar.  Carried.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A special meeting of the Directors of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in Singular’s Hotel on Saturday evening, May 16th 1886, at 8 p.m., the President in the chair.

 

Moved by Mr. Hugh McDiarmid, seconded by Mr. James Patterson, that a deputation consisting of the President, Secretary, and Mr. John Foster wait upon the County Council at their next session to be held in Guelph for the purpose of applying for the county grant of twenty-five dollars to be applied for agricultural purposes in connection with the Puslinch Farmers Club.  Carried.

 

Signed,

James Blair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A special meeting of the Directors of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Monday evening, August 9th, at 8 p.m.  The minutes of the last special meeting were read and adopted, the President in the chair.

 

This meeting was called by the Secretary for the purpose of discussing whether it was advisable to hold a seed wheat fair this fall and to make arrangements in connection with the seed wheat fair.

 

Moved by John Worthington, seconded by Charles Kilner, that the wheat exhibited at the annual fall seed fair be classed as follows:

 

White wheat, class one — Clawson, class two — Democrat, class three — any other variety of white wheat.

 

Red wheat, class one — Scott or Red winter, class two — Michigan Amber, class three — any other variety of Red wheat.

 

Carried.

 

Moved by John Worthington, seconded by Mr. Alexander McCaig, that the following sums be paid as general prizes in each class of wheat, first prize — three dollars, second prize — two dollars, third prize — one dollar.

 

The special prize of three dollars given by Mr. James Laidlaw, Esq., M.P.P., be awarded to the heaviest white wheat.

 

The special prize of three dollars given by Mr. James Innes, Esq., M.P., be awarded to the heaviest red wheat.

 

The special prize of two dollars given by Mr. James Goldie & Sons be awarded to the purest and best cleaned white wheat.

 

The special prize of two dollars given by J. & G. Preasant be awarded to the purest and best cleaned red wheat.

 

Moved by Mr. Hugh McDiarmid, seconded by Mr. Worthington, that the fall wheat seed fair in connection with the club be held on Wednesday, August 25th 1886, in the city of Guelph.  Carried.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual fall wheat seed fair in connection with the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Drill Shed in Guelph on Wednesday, August twenty-fifth 1886, when prizes were awarded for three different varieties of white winter wheat and three different varieties of red winter wheat.  All of the different samples of wheat exhibited were of a first-class quality as regards plumpness and soundness of grain and all were exceptionally well cleaned of obnoxious seeds.  There was a large turnout of farmers from the surrounding townships to purchase seed grain from the exhibitors and mostly all of the wheat changed hands at an advance on the market quotations.  The following gentlemen kindly officiated as judges, Mr. Thomas Waters of Eramosa, James P. Phelan, and Charles Colfax.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held at the Town Hall, Aberfoyle on Saturday evening, February 5th 1887, at 7:30 p.m., when the minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.

 

The Secretary-Treasurer handed in his annual reports.  Moved and seconded that Geo. Fraser and W. J. Cockburn be appointed auditors in the absence of the two who were appointed last annual meeting.

 

The accounts being examined and found correct, it was moved by John Foster, seconded by Joseph Smith, that the auditors report be adopted.  Carried.

 

In the absence of the President, W. J. Cockburn took the chair.

 

Moved by John Foster, seconded by Geo. Fraser, that Joseph Smith be the President for the ensuing year.  Carried.

 

Moved by H. Hammersley, seconded by Mr. Kilner, that John Foster be Vice-President.  Carried.

 

Moved by John Foster, seconded by Mr. Kilner, that the following gentlemen be Directors for the ensuing year: Geo. Fraser, Herbert Hammersley, Jacob Schultz, James Scott, John Worthington, John A. Smith, and Chas. Kilner.

 

Moved by Mr. Foster, seconded by Mr. Fraser, that W. J. Cockburn be Secretary-Treasurer for the ensuing year.  Carried.

 

Moved by Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. Foster, that Mr. Christopher McBeath and Matthew Martin be auditors for the ensuing year.

 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Smith, seconded by Mr. Kilner, that the subject for discussion at the next meeting be the best class of cows to be kept for dairy purposes.  Carried.

 

Moved by John Foster, seconded by Joseph Smith, that a vote of thanks be tendered to the retiring Secretary-Treasurer for the able manner in which he has discharged his duties while he held that office of this club.  Carried.

 

Mr. Kilner responded to the hearty vote of thanks tendered by the members present, and then the meeting adjourned.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The regular monthly meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, March 11th 1887, when the minutes of the annual meeting were read and adopted, the President in the chair.

 

The subject under discussion this evening was the best class of cows to be kept for dairy purposes, which was lead by Joseph Smith and followed by others present in a lively manner, with differences of opinion.

 

Moved by John Foster, seconded by John Worthington, that we hold the annual seed fair on Friday, the 1st of April.  Carried.

 

Moved by John Worthington, seconded by Charles Kilner, that the prizes awarded for grain be the same as last year.  Carried.

 

Moved by Charles Kilner, seconded by John Foster, that a prize of one dollar be given in the following class of potatoes, Rose Beauty Hebron and any other kind of potato.  Carried.

 

Moved by John Worthington, seconded by Mr. Norrish, that the following gentlemen be appointed judges at the seed fair, Messrs. John Moffat, Charles Kilner, and James Laney.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Town Hall Aberfoyle, on Monday evening, June 20th 1887, the President in the chair.

 

The subject under discussion this evening was the best method of maintaining and repairing township roads.  The subject was opened by Mr. John Worthington who approved of maintaining and repairing roads by a direct tax, that is, to pay money directly to men employed by the municipal council.  Mr. Worthington, in his remarks, stated that he had been a pathmaster for a number of years and he found it a great difficulty in getting the proper amount of work performed by those called out on his beat, as it ought to be faithfully and honourably done.

 

Mr. Joseph Smith took up the discussion by stating that his views did not coincide with Mr. Worthington’s remarks as he knew that not all farmers were in a position to pay out money in the shape of taxes during the time that the road work is performed throughout the country.  Mr. Smith, in his remarks, stated that pathmasters should compel all men to draw a given number of loads of gravel for each day that they were on the road and make each man draw a full yard to the load.  All men with teams should draw at least 12 loads per day as they generally had two men to load for them and the gravel not more than half a mile at the farthest.  If the pathmasters would follow this out, we would have better roads. 

 

Afterwards, the discussion was taken up by Mr. Kilner who supported Mr. Worthington in his remarks as he found it a great difficulty in getting some farmers to turn out in the appointed time to repair the road.  Mr. Kilner advocated employing two men in each section for eight months throughout the summer and to appoint an inspector, to be chosen by the council, to look after these two men and to inspect the work at least every two weeks.  These two men would do far more satisfactory work for twenty-five dollars than four men with teams would do in ten days.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the New Western Hotel, Guelph, on August the 6th 1887, the President in the chair.

 

The minutes were read and adopted.  The business of the meeting was to arrange for the holding of the annual fall seed fair.

 

Moved by Mr. Jno. Foster, seconded by Mr. Kilner, that the seed fair be held in the Drill Shed, Guelph.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Atkinson, seconded by Mr. Douglas, that the seed fair be held on the 23rd of August.  Carried.

 

The prize list is to be the same as last year, together with the specials offered.  A special prize of $3 has been donated by James Innes, M.P. for the heaviest wheat.  A special prize has been given by D. Guthrie, M.P.P., for the heaviest white wheat.  A special prize of $2 has been given by Jas. Goldie & Sons for the cleanest red wheat.  A special prize has been given by J. & G. Presant for the cleanest white wheat.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Saturday evening, the 7th of January 1888, the President in the chair.

 

The business of the meeting was to discuss and make arrangements for the annual reunion. 

 

It was moved by Mr. J. H. Doughty, seconded by Mr. John Foster, that we hold our annual concert and dance on the 25th of January.  Carried.

 

It was moved by Mr. John Worthington, seconded by H. Hammersley, that the President, Vice-President, Secretary, P. Mahon, Jas. Scott, and P. Falconbridge be a committee to make arrangements for the concert and dance.

 

It was moved and seconded, that the following gentlemen be invited, James Innes, M.P., D. Guthrie, M.P.P., James Laidlaw, Thos. Goldie, G. W. Field, Jno. Mowat, W. L. Gordon, and Mr. Cowan.

 

Moved and seconded, that Jas. Scott and Geo. Fraser be doorkeepers for the concert and Jno. Foster and Wm. Couzins for the dance.

 

Moved and seconded, that Wm. McIntosh, Harry Foster, and Jas. Scott act as floor managers.

 

Moved and seconded, that the President, Mr. Mahon, and Mr. Little be the entertainment committee.

 

Signed,

Joseph Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club and South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle on Saturday evening, 4th of February 1888.  The attendance was not as large as it ought to have been but those present took a very lively interest in the meeting.  The President, Mr. Joseph Smith, occupied the chair.  The financial report was read, which showed a good balance on hand and the club in a flourishing condition.

 

 The meeting then proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year, and the following gentlemen were duly elected:  President — P. Mahon, Vice-President — James Scott, Secretary-Treasurer — W. J. Cockburn, Auditors — B. Falconbridge and Geo. Fraser.

Directors: Joseph Smith, Matthew Martin, Wm. Rae, P. Falconbridge, and Joseph Little, Puslinch/ Thomas Waters, Eramosa/ John I. Hobson, Mosborough/ G. B. Hood, James Laidlaw, and George Atkinson, Guelph Township/

 

It was resolved to hold a meeting of the institute in Guelph at such a time as might be found convenient in March.  It was also decided that arrangements be made with the Commercial Union Club of Toronto to address a mass meeting in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, about the 25th of February.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Western Hotel, Guelph, on Saturday, the 10th of March 1888.  The President was in the chair.

 

The business of the meeting was to make arrangements to hold an institute meeting in Guelph.

 

It was moved by Mr. James Laidlaw, seconded by Mr. Wm. Rae, that a meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute be held in the City Hall, Guelph at as early a date as possible and that the meeting be held on Thursday, the 22nd, and Friday, the 23rd, of March, commencing at 2 p.m. on the first day and at 7:30 in the evening, and at 10:30 a.m. on the next day and at 1:30 in the afternoon.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Jas. Scott, seconded by Mr. Thos. W., that the following gentlemen be a committee to make arrangements for the meeting, Messrs. James Laidlaw, J. I. Hobson, Major Hood, Wm. Rae, Jas. Scott, and the President and the Secretary.

 

It was moved that the following gentlemen be asked to prepare papers to be read at the meeting, Messrs. John Duff, Thos. Waters, James Ramsay, Jas. Laidlaw, Jas. Anderson, Wm. Whitelaw, and Wm. Rae.

 

It was decided to have vocal and instrumental music at the meeting on Thursday evening.  The meeting then adjourned until Wednesday, the 14th, to arrange the programme.

 

 

 

 

 

The adjourned meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Western Hotel at 10 o’ clock Wednesday morning, 14th of March 1888, the President in the chair.

 

The programme was prepared and other arrangements for the carrying out of the meeting were concluded.

 

Moved by Mr. Scott, seconded by Mr. Hobson, that Mr. Laidlaw and Mr. Mahon be a committee to secure talent for the evening session of the 22nd.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. James Laidlaw, seconded by Mr. James Scott, that Mr. J. I. Hobson and Mr. Hood be a committee to wait upon the City Council to try and get the use of the City Hall free on the 22nd and 23rd to hold the institute meeting.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Thursday evening, March 8th.

 

The subject under discussion was the “Commercial Union”, the President in the chair.  The meeting was opened by a speech from the President, Mr. P. Mahon.  A large number of the farmers and tradesmen of the surrounding district were present.  The chairman in his opening remarks gave a short outline of his opinion with regard to the subject that was before the meeting, also stating that the club had two gentlemen from Toronto to address them and at once called upon one of the speakers, Mr. James, to address the meeting.

 

Mr. James opened his address by stating that he was glad to be here this evening to express his views as regards the principal topic now engaging the minds of the people in this country, that of Commercial Union.  Mr. James went fully into the subject and addressed the audience for one hour, receiving very courteous attention from the audience.

 

The chairman then introduced Mr. Carr of Toronto, the Secretary of the Commercial Union Club, who spoke for fully three-quarters of an hour, keeping the attention of the audience closely riveted upon him.  Upon the speaker resuming his seat, Mr. Mahon then called upon anyone in the audience to ask questions.

 

Moved by James McLean, seconded by James Lennie, that in the opinion of this meeting, the largest possible measure of Free Reciprocal Trade in products of the farm, mine, forest, fisheries, and manufactured goods, note subject to Inland Revenue, that may be attainable on equitable terms between the Dominion of Canada and the United States, is desirable and to be sought by all legitimate means within our power.

 

Moved by Mr. McCormack, seconded by Pelham Falconbridge, that a note of thanks be tendered to Mr. James and Mr. Carr.  Upon the motion being put before the meeting by the chairman, it was carried unanimously.

 

Signed,

Peter Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

 

Guelph, March 22nd 1888.

The South Wellington Farmers Institute held its first meeting in the City Hall, Guelph.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the City Hall, Guelph, on Thursday, the 22nd of March 1888.  The meeting was called to order shortly after half past one o’ clock.  The President, Peter Mahon, was in the chair.  He opened the meeting by an address.  He remarked that it was fourteen years since the Puslinch Farmers Club was organized and much good had been done by the club during that time, yet all that had been expected had not been realized.  The constitution, principles, and objects of our farmers club, being in complete harmony with those of farmers’ institutes, we meet today under the more expanded designation, as the South Wellington Farmers Institute.  He continued, saying if farmers were to meet, as we have done today, but oftener, for the interchange of ideas and experiences, our ideas would be purified in the crucible of discussion, and a very large amount of valuable, practical information would be gained and would be organized and be able to resist, if necessary, the encroachments upon our rights of unscrupulous combines.

 

The President then called on Mr. Thos. Shaw, the Secretary of the Permanent Central Farmers Institute of Ontario to read a paper on “The Unclaimed Heritage of the Canadian Farmer”.  He claimed that the Canadian farmer had been made by nature, a noble man in point of education, but that he had never risen to the height of privilege that lay before him in this respect.  He laid down the principle that a farmer’s son, given education in the scientific side of his future life work and possessing the practical at the same time, would, on every occasion, beat the boy that only possessed one of these.  He continued, saying that our farmers then were certainly negligent to their duty to their sons when only one in ten-thousand of them put his son to take a course at the Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, the only institution that we had in Canada where a farmer’s son could get a better education in his future life work.  He spoke on the “unwisdom” of farmers choosing their representatives so often from men of other callings, and accounted for it by the fact that the strongest platform speakers were found in the ranks of the profession.  It cannot be otherwise, for the brightest of their sons are sent from the farms to the professions, and in such a case, when the cream is sent away, the skim milk only must remain.

 

Mr. Laidlaw repudiated the idea of farmers being untrue to their heritage and instanced the trials and hardships of the early settlers to build up this great country.  No one looking over the history of the past could say that the farmers of Ontario had been untrue to their interests.  It would be seen that they had done their duty in building up the country.

 

Messrs. Sorby and Ramsay also entered into the discussion.  Prof. Mills thought that the farmers could hold their own and advocated the educating of farmers’ sons for the farm, interesting them in the work therein, and imparting to them all the knowledge possible in regard to farming.

 

Mr. James Laidlaw Jr. was called upon to read a paper entitled “Some mistakes made by farmers”.  He held that beyond the agricultural industries, farmers were equally interested, if not more, in the trade affairs of the country generally, and in the construction and working of railways, canals etcetera.  But while acknowledging the necessity of these, he thought that it was a mistake to submit quietly to the exorbitant demands that these corporations sometimes made.  Farmers should make themselves acquainted with what was going on in the country and band themselves together for their own interests, the same as the members of every other trade and profession.  It was a great mistake that they did not do so.

 

Another mistake was toiling and working from four in the morning until dark at night, the farmer not only doing the same thing himself but expecting everyone on the farm to do so, and setting forth that the mind as well as the body required a due amount of rest.  He considered that ten hours a day was enough to work if not a little too much, both for man and beast. 

 

Other mistakes were not under-draining enough and draining too carelessly.  Other points were touched such as handling manure, curing hay, and killing weeds.

 

Prof. Mills thought that there were times, in harvest and haying, when it was necessary to work early and late but that there was no need for it as a general rule.  When it was needed, he would make every man and horse do it.

 

Messrs. John Scott and Hobson entered into the discussion and were in favour of the ten-hour days.

 

Prof. Brown followed, reading a paper “The reasonableness of a general purpose breed of cattle”.  The professor, in his remarks, pointed out that in his opinion farmers were going too much into the breeding of cattle for special purposes.  He believed that to have a little of everything was the safest ground.  For the average farmer, he advocated competing breeds for general purpose use, and for this end, the common cow of the country was as good as could be had in any land and was as much thoroughbred as other cattle natives of another country.  He advised the careful selection of the bull and he also desired a big, greedy cow.  He spoke of the use of Durhams in this connection.

 

Mr. W. W. Kenny entered into the discussion.  His idea was to get the most milk with the least expense.  He held that a bull, if not bred from a milking strain, was no good for milking stock no matter how good he looked.  He did not look for beauty in a milking cow; it was her milking qualities that he sought.  The more that the breed was crossed; the more milk would be got.

 

Mr. Gowdy said that he had 35 years experience with cows and the best cow that he ever had was a three-quarters bred Durham from a Devon Bull.  She gave more and richer milk than any cow that he ever knew.

 

Messrs. J. I. Hobson and Taylor entered into a short discussion on the best breed for the market, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Meeting of the South Wellington County Farmers Institute

Evening Session

Held at City Hall, Guelph, on Thursday, March 22nd 1888.

 

The evening session was opened by the President making a few remarks, regretting that there were not more present.  He called upon Mr. John Higgins to sing a song, which he did in a most satisfactory manner.  He was followed by the O.A.C. Glee Club, which as well as Mr. Higgins, rendered several pieces during the evening.

 

Professor Mills was first called upon to speak.  He regretted that there were not more present to listen to matters which directly interested themselves, and perhaps the reason that there were not more present on this occasion was that the farmers of South Wellington had been so well educated that they knew all that they wanted to know about agriculture, and perhaps a little more.  Then the speaker could impart to them that the attention of the whole province recently seemed to be concentrated in this question of agriculture, and men of all callings and political views were taking a deep interest in it.  The question was non-political and a good deal of interest that has been awakened in it, might justly be attributed to the farmers institutes.  He also spoke of the important part that the farmer acted in the country in building it up and sustaining it.  He thought that the life of the farmer would compare favourably with those of any other profession.  As regards health, no people had purer water, fresher air, better food, and more healthful exercise for the development of the mind and body than the farmer.  In independence, he is ahead of anyone else.  If the farmer could not make money as fast as the merchant, he could live just as comfortably and happily.  If they had the learning and training to their work that the merchant had, they would be able to make money faster.  He thought farmers should have more taste about their homes and surroundings.  He would have trees planted and flowers planted, and new fences, and improve the appearance of the farm to make it pleasant for his boys.  If a farmer wore old clothes around the barnyard, that was no reason why he should go to town with them, as a good many farmers did.  In regards to health, independence, and leisure, the farmer stood first.  Although he might not make money fast, he was almost sure to succeed, yet more education was required, more taste in the home, and more attention to personal appearance.

 

 Mr. D. Guthrie, M.P.P., made a short and interesting speech.  He pointed out that a man, to be successful, must keep abreast with the times and throw his whole heart into the business.  A farmer also wanted to be a man of business.  He also spoke of making the home attractive and comfortable, with music, good books, and newspapers, and having social intercourse with their neighbours.

 

Professor Phanton gave an able address on some of the geological features of the country and the formation of the soil.

 

Professor James followed, on “The average man”, which was listened to by all with much interest.

 

Mr. James Laidlaw and the President followed in a few remarks, regretting that there were so few present, which went to show that farmers were not alive to their interests.  Singing “God Save the Queen” brought the meeting to a close.  The Institute adjourned until Friday at ten o’ clock.

 

 

 

 

 

Meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute

Morning Session, Friday March 23rd 1888.

Held at City Hall, Guelph.

 

The second day’s proceedings opened about 10:30 and the first subject taken up was a paper on “Sheep Breeding” by Mr. Thomas Waters of Eramosa.  The paper was full of very useful information as to the best breed of sheep for the use of the Canadian farmer.  In the course of the subject, Mr. Waters that the Cotswold sheep were the best as they were the largest animals and good mutton and wool producers.  He spoke of the different breeds and in taking up the crosses, he said that it would be a benefit to Canadian farmers to raise a breed from the crossing of the Southdown and Leicester, as the lambs would mature earlier and were the best for the American market and would sell at a profit.  He also answered some questions that were asked him regarding the care that sheep should have in the winter, especially the Cotswold.  He thought that all that was necessary was to give them plenty of air and in case of storm, he put his in their pens and left the top doors open to keep them from sweating.

 

Prof. Brown, Mr. Wm. Whitelaw, and Mr. Thos. McCrae took up the discussion, after which the meeting adjourned until 1:30 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

Meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute

Afternoon Session, Friday March 23rd 1888.

Held at City Hall, Guelph.

 

Mr. McCrae continued his remarks, in which he said that he agreed with Mr. Waters that the Cotswold was the best breed for this country.  They brought a larger per cent to the farmer than any other breed.  He said that in feeding lambs turnips they did not need so much water as when fed dry feed.  He had two farms, one with running water through it and the other not, and that the sheep on the watered farm thrived the best.  He had kept an average for the past three years of his wool producers and found that the Cotswold average a fleece of 8¾ lbs. of good washed wool at a clipping.

 

Professor Panton then gave a short and practical address on smut and rust, which was made interesting by the growth of this fungus being illustrated by charts, showing its formation and explaining that rust is a parasite that can not be seen by the naked eye but requires a microscopic of 270 power to make it visible.  He also explained its growth and how it developed itself from the beginning until it did the damage to the wheat crop.  He advised the farmers to sow their grain in good time and avoid too rich farming and sowing in damp places and to keep away from barberry hedges.  A number of questions were asked him by Messrs. Hobson, Laidlaw, Whitelaw, Hood, and Gilchrist, as to the best way to prevent smut.  Professor Panton answered by saying to clean the wheat by washing it in a solution of sulphate of lead and water or blue vitriol.

 

Mr. James Anderson’s paper on poultry breeding came next on the programme.  Good advice was given as to the best breed for the farmer.  He held that the Light Brahmas and Houdans were the best breeds for eggs.  They were good feeders and were not so susceptible to disease as other breeds.  He also gave high testimony to the rapid strides that poultry raising had made in the Dominion.  About eight or ten years ago, there were very few if any breeders in the country but at the present time breeders and exhibitors have sprung up all over the Dominion and there are over ninety professional breeders in the business.  He then gave his twenty-five years experience as a poultry breeder, in which he had tried six or eight of the leading varieties of fowls and considered the Light Brahmas the best for general purposes, the second, the Plymouth Rock.  For the farmer’s use, the flesh of the Brahma is white, tender, and excellent for the table.  They early come to maturity and lay larger eggs and more than any other variety.

 

In ducks, his preference was the Alesbury and Rowen.  In geese, he preferred the Toulouse.  The annual value of poultry in Canada was $25,000.00 as near as can be estimated.

 

Prof. Brown, and Messrs. J. Hobson, Smith, and Cook also spoke on the subject.

 

Mr. John Duff next took the platform and read a paper on horse breeding.  He said that the agricultural or general-purpose horse was the most suitable for all farming purposes and that it should weigh from 1200 to 1400 lbs, whips (?) in good condition, with good action, compactness, well-sprung ribs, and large flat bones.  He spoke of the lighter and faster breeds, speed goes with the grey hound class of horses and those are the qualities not wanted in a farm horse.  There should be two or three distinct breeds of horses and each bred with a special reference to its particular work.

 

Prof. James gave a short address on the feeding of cattle in which he illustrated by different charts the different methods of feeding cattle and gave the manner of producing flesh, muscle, and milk, which was well received by the farmers present.

 

Votes of thanks to the gentlemen who read the papers and those who delivered them and to the President were given and the meeting closed.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club and South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Western Hotel, Guelph, on 21st of July 1888, to make arrangements for the annual fall seed fair.  The President was in the chair.

 

Moved by Geo. Atkinson, seconded by Thos. Weir, that the fall seed fair be held in the Drill Shed, Guelph, on the 23rd of August 1888.  Carried.

 

Moved and seconded, that there be prizes given for the following kinds of white winter wheat,

Clawson

1st — $3.00

2nd — $2.00

3rd — $1.00

Democrat

1st — $3.00

2nd — $2.00

3rd — $1.00

Any other variety

1st — $3.00

2nd — $2.00

3rd — $1.00

 

and for the following varieties of red winter wheat,

Scott wheat

1st — $3.00

2nd — $2.00

3rd — $1.00

Any other variety

1st — $3.00

2nd — $2.00

3rd — $1.00

 

Special Prizes:

By D. Guthrie, M.P.P., for the purest and best cleaned and heaviest white wheat, 1st prize — $2.00, 2nd — $1.00.

By James Innes, M.P., for the purest and best cleaned and heaviest white wheat, 1st prize — $2.00, 2nd — $1.00

By James Goldie & Sons, the best two bushels of any white wheat not hitherto shown; character of, yield of strain, and hardiness taken into account — $2.50

By James Goldie & Sons, the purest and best cleaned Clawson — $2.50

By E. & G. Presant, for the purest and best cleaned Silver Chaff.

 

Moved and seconded that the following gentlemen be invited to act as judges, Messrs. James Goldie, H. Black, and Wm. Garrish.  Carried.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, December 28th 1888.  The President was in the chair and the business of the meeting was to make arrangements for the annual reunion of the club.

 

It was moved by P. Falconbridge, seconded by John Foster, that we hold a concert and dance for our annual reunion for the coming year and that it be held on the 18th of January, if suitable.  Carried.

 

Moved by John Foster, seconded by E. Taylor, that the President and the Secretary be a committee to secure the talent for the concert and report at the next meeting.  Carried.

 

Moved and seconded, that the following gentlemen be the general committee and that the sub-committee appointed out of the general committee be Messrs. James Scott, Vice-President, P. Falconbridge, Jas. Smith, J. Foster, H. Hammersley, Geo. Fraser, J. H. Doughty, J. G. Cockburn, W. J. Couzins, E. Taylor, M. Martin, and M. Clifford.

 

Moved and seconded that the Secretary purchase 150 checks to be used to check clothing at the annual reunion and that J. H. Doughty buy a sheepskin to make straps for the checks.  Carried.

 

Moved and seconded, that the following gentlemen be invited, Messrs. James Innes, M.P., D. Guthrie, M.P.P., James Laidlaw, ex M.P.P., Prof. Shaw of O.A.C., and G. W. Field.  Carried.

 

Moved and seconded that the McQuillan String Band be engaged to supply the music for the dance.  Carried.

 

The meeting then adjourned to meet on Monday, the 31st of December.

 

 

 

 

 

An adjourned meeting of the committee was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Friday evening, January 11th.  The President in the chair, the entertainment committee read a letter from the Guelph Catholic Union Glee Club offering their services to supply talent for the concert, also our choice of two programmes, one for $26.00, the other for $32.00.  The $26.00 programme was adopted by the meeting.

 

Moved and seconded that the following gentlemen be the entertainment committee to entertain speakers and singers, Jos. Smith, Jas. Scott, and the President.  Carried.

 

Moved and seconded, that Geo. Fraser and James Scott be doorkeepers for the concert, and John Foster and J. H. Doughty, for the dance.  Carried.

 

Moved and seconded, that J. Scott, H. Foster, and Wm. McIntosh be floor managers for the dance.  Carried.

 

Moved and seconded, that J. H. Doughty and P. Falconbridge be checkers, and J. T. Cockburn, H. Hammersley, E. Taylor, and W. J. Couzins be ushers.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club and South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Western Hotel, Guelph, on Saturday January 19th 1889, at 2 o’ clock p.m.  The President was in the chair.  The business of the meeting was to appoint two delegates to attend the Central Farmers Institute Meeting to be held in the York Chambers, Toronto, on February 5th, 6th, and 7th.

 

Moved by Mr. Rae, seconded by Mr. Worthington, that Mr. James Laidlaw and the President be the delegates to attend the Institute meeting at Toronto.  Carried.

 

Moved by Mr. Rae, seconded by Mr. Hood, that the annual meeting of this institute be held in the Western Hotel on Saturday January 26th 1889, at 2 o’ clock p.m.  Carried.

 

Suggested by Mr. Laidlaw, that the Secretary write to Professor Mills of the College and see when it would be convenient for the Professor to attend our next regular meeting to be held in the City Hall, Guelph.

 

Signed,

P. Mahon.

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club and South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Western Hotel on January 26th 1889.  The President was in the chair, the minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted, and the financial statement was read by the Secretary and adopted by the meeting.

 

The election of officers was proceeded with and the following gentlemen elected.

 

President:

Mr. P. Mahon

Vice-President:

Mr. Jas. Laidlaw

Secretary-Treasurer:

Mr. W. J. Cockburn

Directors:

Guelph Township:

G. B. Hood, W. McCrae, A. Whitelaw, and W. W. Kenny.

 

Puslinch:

Jas. Smith, Wm. Rae, and John Worthington,

 

Eramosa:

Thos. Waters, Hugh Black, A. Johnson, and E. Parkinson

 

 

A few suggestions were made by Messrs. Hobson, Laidlaw, McCrae, and others regarding the meeting in Guelph.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of Directors of the South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Western Hotel on Saturday afternoon, at 9 p.m., on January 26th 1899.  The President in the chair, Mr. Hobson was appointed secretary, pro tempore.

 

The President explained that the meeting was called to make arrangements for fixing the date of the next meeting to be held in Guelph.

 

Moved by Mr. McCrae, seconded by J. Worthington, that the meetings be held on the 22nd and 23rd of February.  Carried.

 

Moved and seconded, that the meeting open at 10 a.m. and again at 2 p.m., continuing on Saturday, commencing at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

 

The meeting is to be opened by the President’s address, followed by Mr. J. Hobson’s paper on “Summer Fallowing” and then a paper by Thos. Gowdy on “What the Farmers Lose by the Credit System”.  At 2 p.m., “The Science of Feeding” will be presented by Professor James, followed by “The Value of Agricultural Exhibitions as Educators of the People” by Wm. McCrae and “Winter Management of Sheep” by A. H. Whitelaw.  On Saturday at 10 a.m., “The Necessity of the Higher Education of Farmers’ Sons” by A. Johnston, will be presented, followed by “The Advantages of Soilage” by Prof. Shaw.  At 2 p.m., James Laidlaw Sr. will present “Agricultural Depression, its cause and cure”, followed by “Beef Cattle” by Prof. Mills.

 

Moved and seconded, that all of the speakers be confined to half an hour and less, if possible.  Moved by Mr. McCrae, seconded by Mr. Laidlaw, that an Institute meeting be held in Aberfoyle on the 15th of March at 7 o’ clock.  Carried.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of South Wellington Farmers Institute opened at 11 o’ clock in the City, Guelph, on February 22nd.  In the absence of the President, James Laidlaw Sr., Vice-President took the chair.

 

The first gentleman called upon to address the meeting was J. H. Hobson who read a paper on “Summer Fallowing or its Substitutes”.  He dwelt considerably with the best means of ridding the farms of weeds.  The discussion of the paper was entered upon by the majority of those present.  The meeting adjourned at half-past one.

 


 

The Afternoon Session

 

The meeting was opened by reading a telegram from the President, stating that he was snow bound.

 

Mr. Gowdy then read a paper on “What the Farmers Lose by the Credit System”, in which he deprecated the evils and advantages arising from the long credit system.

 

Mr. Wm. McCrae followed with a paper on “The Value of Agricultural Exhibitions as Educators of the People”.  The paper led to considerable discussion.

 

Moved by Wm. McCrae, seconded by G. B. Hood, that this meeting views with sorrow the doing away with of the annual grant to the Provincial.  They would urge, by needed reforms, to amend the working of that institution so as to continue its usefulness in the future.  Carried unanimously.

 

The President entered the room and was requested to take the chair.  He then called upon Prof. James, who read a paper on “The Soil, the Atmosphere and the Plants”.  Messrs. Clarke, Laidlaw, Hobson, McRim, Whitelaw, and others took part in the discussion.

 

The meeting then adjourned.

 


 

Saturday February 23rd.

 

The meeting opened at 10:45, The President in the chair.  The President opened the meeting by giving an address.  The discussion on chess was taken up, on which a considerable discussion took place.   Prof. Mills said that chess was a distinct species of plant and would grow better some places than others.

 

Prof. Shaw was then called upon to give his paper on “The Advantages of Soilage”.

 

The meeting then adjourned until the afternoon.

 


 

Afternoon Session

 

The meeting was opened by a paper read by James Laidlaw on “Agricultural Depression; its cause and cure”.  The discussion on the paper was a very lively one and a large amount of information was obtained.

 

The next paper was by Prof. Mills on “Beef Cattle”, in which he spoke of the judging of beef cattle.  A large number of opinions were expressed as to the best form of an animal for beef.

 

A vote of thanks was tendered to the Profs. of the College and the other gentlemen who prepared and read papers for the edification of the members of this Institute.  Also, a vote of thanks was tendered to the City Council for the use of the Hall on this occasion.  A vote of thanks was also given to the President, the Secretary, and the Press, after which the meeting closed, to meet again in Aberfoyle, on the 15th of March.

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Town Hall, Aberfoyle, on Wednesday evening, March 13th 1889.  The President, Mr. P. Mahon, took the chair.  There was a good turnout of farmers and all seemed to take a great interest in the meeting.  The speakers received the best attention and their remarks were interesting and profitable.

 

A discussion took place as to the advisability of holding the annual seed fair this spring or not.  It was resolved to hold it as usual.

 

Prof. Shaw was called upon to address the meeting on “The Agricultural College”.  He was warmly received by those present.  He gave a very able address on the benefits of the O.A.C. and the usefulness of it to the farmers of the province.  He also gave a thorough insight into the work that is carried on at the College.  He concluded by asking the farmers in supporting him all they could towards making the College a success.

 

Mr. P. Mahon next took up the subject and coincided with Prof. Shaw’s remarks and thought that all present would get a great benefit from his address and asked anyone who wished to ask Prof. Shaw any questions regarding the College, that he was ready to answer them.

 

Sheriff McRim was called upon.  He thought that the O.A.C. was a fine institution and that it was doing a good work.  He went back to the early days of the College and compared it with now, showing to what an extent the work had improved in these years.

 

Mr. Wm. McCrae next took up the discussion of the subject.  He also thought that the College was doing a good work.  He asked Prof. Shaw some questions in regards to the work carried on at the College.  He also suggested some improvements that he thought could be made in carrying out some branches of the work done there.

 

Messrs. Wm. Rae, M. P. Doyle, and others took up the discussion and endorsed what Prof. Shaw had said in his address.

 

Mr. Rennie, (?) one of the students in attendance at the College, was called upon and gave some very practical points on butter making.

 

It was moved by Mr. Rae, seconded by Mr. Wm. McCrae, that the next meeting be held at S. S. No. 6, Paisley Block.  Carried.

 

Moved by Wm. Rae, seconded by Hugh Cockburn, that a vote of thanks be tendered to Prof. Shaw for the able and interesting address that he had delivered.  A vote of thanks was also tendered to the President for the able manner in which he presided over the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the South Wellington Farmers Institute was held at the Centre Inn, Eramosa on Wednesday, May 15th 1889.  In the absence of the President, Mr. James Laidlaw, Vice-President, took the chair.  Mr. Laidlaw, in taking the chair, expressed his pleasure at seeing so many present, which was due evidence of the interest taken by the farmers of Eramosa in the work.

 

Moved by Messrs. Wm. McCrae and Hobson that the next meeting be held in Rockwood on June 14th at 7 o’ clock.

 

Mr. Laidlaw then introduced Prof. Robertson who took up the subject “Dairy Farming and Silage”.  He spoke on the use of cattle, the kind of cows to keep, the kind of feed to grow and how to preserve it, the time when the largest flow of milk should be produced and how to make the most of it.  He stated that any farmer could sell his skill through his labour.  He advocated the keeping of more stock.  He also explained what kind of cow a farmer should keep to make the most money and pointed out the good qualities or points a cow should have, explaining them all thoroughly as he went along.  He spoke of the best kind of cow for beef.  He said to have the cow give milk in the winter months that it was necessary to give her green fodder and that this could be done by growing corn and preserving it in a silo.  The corn should be sown in drills three feet apart and dropped every six inches.  He said that it was a mistake to sow corn broadcast.  One hundred tons of ensilage was equal to or would feed more than 50 tons of hay.  Ensilage could be fed at forty or fifty lbs. per day or at a cost of 4 to 5 cents and not exceed 10 cents.

 

Prof. Shaw was next called upon and he endorsed what Prof. Robertson had said.  He spoke for some time on the Agricultural College and the benefits of it to the farmers.

 

Messrs. Innes, Waters, Black, Hobson, Mutrie, Johnson, Ramsay, Parkinson, and others entered into the discussion.  A vote of thanks was tendered to the professors, the chairman, and the secretary and the meeting then adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

A meeting of the directors of the South Wellington Farmers Club was held in the Western Hotel, Guelph, on Thursday December 12th 1899, at 1:30.  The following gentlemen were present, P. Mahon, President, James Laidlaw, Vice-President, Thos. Waters, Wm. Rae, G. B. Hood, W. W. Kenny, John Worthington, Jas. Scott, Jno. Foster, and the secretary.

 

The business of the meeting was the advisability of holding the annual concert and ball.

 

It was move by Jno. Foster, seconded by James Laidlaw, that the annual concert and ball be held at Aberfoyle on January 15th 1890, and that the annual meeting be held on the following Saturday in Guelph.

 

Moved by James Laidlaw, seconded by G. B. Hood, that the following gentlemen be the general committee for the entertainments, with the power to add to their numbers, Messrs. James Scott, H. Hammersley, P. Falconbridge, J. Foster, Jas. Smith, W. J. Couzins, J. H. Doughty, Moses Burns, E. Taylor, Wm. Rae, Wm. McCrae, James Laidlaw Jr., A. Johnston, and E. Parkinson.

 

Moved by W. W. Kenny, seconded by John Worthington, that the sum of two dollars be paid for rent of the Hall at Rockwood.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

Signed,

P. Mahon, President.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club and South Wellington Farmers Institute was held in the Western Hotel, Guelph, on Saturday, January 18th 1890, at 2:00 p.m.  There was a good attendance, the President, Mr. P. Mahon, in the chair.  There was a fair attendance.  The Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. W. J. Cockburn, read the annual financial statement, which, on motion, was received and adopted.

 

The election of officers for the current year was then proceeded with, resulting in the election of the following gentlemen.

 

President:

James Laidlaw

Vice-President:

Thomas Waters

Secretary-Treasurer:

P. Mahon

Directors:

Puslinch:

Joseph Smith, Wm. Rae, John Foster, and John Worthington.

 

Guelph Twp.

G. B. Hood, Wm. McCrae, W. W. Kenny, and John McCorkindale.

 

Eramosa:

Hugh Black, Major John Mutrie, Arch’ Johnson, and E. Parkinson.

Delegates to the Central Institute, Toronto:

 

James Laidlaw and James Anderson.

Auditors:

John Iles and Geo. A. Darby.

 

Mr. P. Mahon read a letter sent by James McNaughton of Gourock, which he received from Professor Saunders of the Experimental Farm in Ottawa, in relation to the cultivation of ____(?)-rowed barley, which he recommended.

 

Moved by Mr. G. B. Hood, seconded by Mr. James Anderson, that a hearty vote of thanks be tendered to the retiring President and Secretary for their efficient discharge of their duties during the time that they were in office, which was carried, and responded to by those gentlemen, after which the meeting adjourned.

 

 

                                                                                       

 

 

A meeting of the officers was held immediately afterwards, to make arrangements for holding a two-day Institute meeting in Guelph, the President, James Laidlaw, in the chair.

 

Moved by W. W. Kenny, seconded by Wm. Rae, that this meeting do now adjourn and that the Directors meet on Saturday next, February 1st 1890, at 2 p.m., to make the necessary arrangements. Carried.

 

Meeting adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

February 21st 1890.

 

The regular two-day annual session of the Puslinch Farmers Club and the South Wellington Farmers Institute was opened in the City Hall, Guelph, today, the President, James Laidlaw, in the chair.  There was a fair attendance of leading farmers present.

 

The President opened the meeting at 11 a.m. by delivering an able address, which was well received by those present.  Moved by W. F. Clark, seconded by James Anderson, that the thanks of this meeting be tendered the President for his able address.  After speeches to the motion by J. I. Hobson and others, the motion was unanimously carried.

 

The delegates to the Central Farmers Institute meeting at Toronto, Mr. Jas. Laidlaw Jr. and Mr. James Anderson, were then called upon and gave a short resume of the proceedings of the convention.  On the motion of J. I. Hobson, seconded by Prof. Mills, a cordial vote of thanks was tendered the delegates.

 

Professor Mills, in speaking to the motion, objected to the increase in salary voted the secretary of the Central Farmers Institute.

 


 

Afternoon Session

 

The first paper was read by J. I. Hobson on the “Breeding and feeding of stock”.  He went very fully into the whole subject, dealing with the beefing types, the dairy and beef types combined or a combination of both.  He dealt particularly with the time that calves should come and the best mode of feeding them.  A lively discussion followed, sustained by W. W. Kenny, Alex Fyfe, John Murphy, John McGeachy, and Wm. McCrae.

 

The 2nd paper was cross breeding by Prof. Shaw.  This paper was both exhaustive and lucid, throwing a flood of light on the system of breeding up or grading up, by using purebred sires on common or grade stock.  An instructive discussion followed, taken part in by Mr. Hobson, Mr. Kenny, the President, D. McCrae, and others.

 

The third paper “Our Horses”, Mr. D. McCrae introduced orally, sustaining his preference for the Clydesdale, by strong arguments.  The address was well received and was ably discussed by Messrs. James Anderson, Major Gowdy, W. F. Clark, John Murphy, and Mr. Hodgekinson.  The meeting adjourned at 5:10 p.m.

 


 

2nd Day, Morning Session

 

The first paper was “The Exchange and Testing of Wheat”.  Mr. Jas. Goldie, in an address, explained the system generally practiced.  The system was sharply criticized by Messrs. Wm. McCrae, Thos. Waters, G. B. Hood, J. I. Hobson, J. Ramsay, and the President.  Mr. Farrish of Rockwood, who was also present by invitation, still further explained the system and answered questions put by Prof. Mills and Mr. Jas. Auld.  Mr. Hortop of Eden still further dwelt on the matter, from the millers point of view, when it was moved by Mr. Hobson, seconded by Mr. Hood, that the farmers and millers present at this meeting consider that it is in the interest of both farmers and millers that the product of the farm and the mill should be bought and sold at its market value and that it is advisable that the system of exchanging wheat for flour should be discontinued, as it has been unsatisfactory in its operation, to all concerned.  Carried.

 

Mr. Jas. Goldie then addressed the meeting in regard to wheat growing.  Prof. James, by request, explained the manures best suited for wheat growing.

 

The meeting adjourned until 1:15 p.m.


 

Afternoon Session

 

The first paper was “The Atmosphere in its Relation to the Soil” by Professor James.  Mr. James’ address was exceedingly interesting and instructive, dealing with the elements of plant food as produced from the atmosphere and the value of under-draining in admitting the atmosphere to the soil.  The discussion was carried on by Prof. Mills and Mr. Kenny.

 

The second paper was “Soiling versus Pasture” read by W. W. Kenny.  This was a practical paper, deduced from the reader’s own experience, well sustaining the advisability of depending largely upon green crops rather than on pasture, especially for dairymen.  He considered an acre of corn equal to 3 tons of hay.  This paper evoked considerable discussion, Mr. Hobson, Mr. Ramsay, Prof. Mills, Wm. McCrae, Mr. Whitelaw, Mr. Hood, Mr. W. F. Clark, Mr. Waters, and Prof. James, all taking part.  Much information was elicited.

 

The third paper was “The Breeding, Feeding, and Management of Hogs”, read by Mr. G. B. Hood.  This was another practical paper, giving Mr. Hood’s experience in the business, with figures showing his profits.  Mr. Wm. McCrae, Mr. Gibson, M.P.P. of Huron, Sheriff McRim, Mr. J. Ramsay, Prof. Mills, Mr. Hodskison, and others took part.  The regular programme being concluded, short addresses were delivered by Prof. Mills, W. F. Clark, and P. Mahon.

 

A concluding address was then delivered by the President, in which he thanked the speakers and people generally for contributing to the success of the meeting, and also the Mayor and Corporation of the City of Guelph for kindly granting the use of the Council Chamber for the meeting.  On the motion of G. B. Hood and M. P. Doyle, the thanks of the Institute was unanimously tendered to the Press for their general courtesy and assistance, after which, the meeting adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

In 1891, Mr. James Laidlaw was again elected President, Wm. McRae, Vice-President, and Peter Mahon, Secretary-Treasurer.

 

In 1892, Wm. McCrae was elected President, G. B. Hood, Vice-President, and Peter Mahon, Secretary-Treasurer.

 

In 1893, G. B. Hood was elected President, Geo. A. Darby, Vice-President, and Peter Mahon, Secretary-Treasurer.

 

  In 1894, Geo. A. Darby was elected President, John Iles, Vice-President, and Peter Mahon, Secretary-Treasurer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual meeting of the Puslinch Farmers Club and South Wellington Farmers Institute was held at the Western Hotel on the 2nd of February 1895, at 2 p.m., the President, Geo. A. Darby, in the chair, P. Mahon, the Secretary.

 

The President called upon the Secretary to read the financial statement, which, on motion, was received and adopted.

 

The meeting proceeded to elect officers for the current year.  Moved by Wm. Laidlaw, seconded by Herbert Wright, that John I. Hobson be President.  Carried.

 

Moved by John Mutrie, seconded by W. W. Kenny, that John Iles be 1st Vice-President.  Carried.

 

Moved by Jas. Scott and seconded, that Wm. Rae be 2nd Vice-President.  Carried.

 

Moved that P. Mahon be Secretary-Treasurer.  Carried.

 

It was moved and seconded that Walter Buchanan, Arch. Marshall, D. McNaughton, and Jas. Hume be Directors for Puslinch.  Carried.

 

Moved by John I. Hobson and seconded, that H. Wright, Geo. A. Darby, W. W. Kenny, J. C. Farrow, G. B. Hood, Wm. Laidlaw, and Alex Fyfe be Directors for Guelph Township.  Carried.

 

Moved and seconded, that John Mutrie, Norris Black, A. S. D. Hill, Thos. Waters, and W. J. Rudd be Directors for Eramosa.  Carried.

 

 Moved and seconded, that Thos. O’Brien and Chas. Nicklin be Directors for Pilkington.  Carried.

 

James Scott and Andrew Whitelaw were re-appointed auditors.

 

The President and Secretary were appointed delegates to the Central Farmers Institute with G. B. Hood as an alternate.

 

The President, 1st and 2nd Vice-Presidents, and Secretary are to be an executive committee.

 

Mr. John Mutrie, seconded by James Scott, moved a vote of thanks to the retiring President, Mr. G. A. Darby, who made a suitable reply.  Mr. F. W. Hodson, Superintendent of Farmers Institutes, was present and made a few remarks on Institute work.  The meeting then adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

Guelph, March 16th 1895.

 

The Directors of the South Wellington Farmers Club met at the Western Hotel at 1 p.m.  Present were the President, John I. Hobson, G. A. Darby, C. Nicklin, H. Wright, Archie Marshall, W. W. Kenny, D. McNaughton, Wm. Rae, Jas. Hume, Allan Stewart, G. North, G. B. Hood, Directors.  F. W. Hodson, Superintendent of Institutes, was also present.

 

The President stated to the meeting that their first duty should be to elect a secretary to take the place of the late Peter Mahon.

  

Moved by W. W. Kenny, seconded by C. Nicklin, that G. B. Hood be secretary and treasurer.  Carried.

 

The following resolution of sympathy was moved by G. A. Darby, seconded by C. Nicklin, that:

 

We take this, our first opportunity since the death of our late secretary, Mr. Peter Mahon, who from the first organization of the Puslinch Farmers Club and South Wellington Farmers Institute, has taken an active interest in its success as well as in everything connected with the best interests of the Farmers and the advancement of the agricultural interests generally, to express our sorrow and regret at his untimely removal in the midst of his usefulness, and would further extend to the widow and family our heartfelt sympathy in their sore bereavement.

 

 It was further moved that the secretary be instructed to forward a copy of this resolution to Mrs. Mahon.  Agreed.

 

The question of having a seed fair was next taken up.  Moved by James Hume, seconded by W. W. Kenny, that a seed fair be held on Wednesday (fair day) the 3rd of April and that the President and Secretary arrange for a place to hold the show.  Carried.

 

Some changes were made in the prize list and Mr. Wm. Rennie, O.A.C., was appointed to act as judge, with Mr. Zavitz as alternate.

 

It was agreed to hold two meetings, one in Puslinch, at Aberfoyle, and the other at Rockwood, the time of the meeting and the arranging of the programme to be left to the executive committee.  Carried.

 

Signed,

John Iles.

 

 

 

 

 

Guelph, May 1st 1895.

 

The seed fair was held on the 3rd of April, according to arrangement, in the Noxon wareroom.  The show was not quite up to the average.  The demand for seed grain was quite brisk, a large quantity changed hands.

 

An Institute meeting was held in Aberfoyle on the evening of the 25th of June, John I. Hobson, Esq., President, in the chair.  Archie Marshall gave a paper on “Special versus Mixed Farming”, Professor Shuttleworth on “Milk Testing”, and Prof. Panton an address on “Parasites and How to Destroy Them”.  There was good attendance and quite an interest was taken in the discussions.

 

On the evening of the 27th of June, the Institute met at Rockwood, John I. Hobson, President, in the chair.  James Sharpe Everton gave an address on “Breeding and Feeding for the British Markets”.  Prof. Day, O.A.C., followed with a paper on “Feeding for Milk”.  Prof. Panton then gave his address on “Parasites and How to Destroy Them”.  The attendance was small but those present were much interested.

 

Signed,

John Iles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guelph, August 7th 1895.

 

The Directors met at 2 p.m.  Present were John Iles, Vice-President, Wm. Rae, G. A. Darby, C. Nicklin, H. Wright, A. Marshall, Jas. Hume, W. W. Kenny, and G. B. Hood.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

Moved by A. Marshall, seconded by G. A. Darby, that a seed fair be held on Saturday August 31st.  Carried.

 

A communication from S. & G. Penfold was read, requesting that the seed fair be held in their warerooms in rotation with the Massey and Noxon warerooms.  Moved by H. Wright, seconded by Jas. Hume, that the seed fair be held in Penfold’s warerooms, MacDonnell Street.  Carried.

 

Moved by G. A. Darby, seconded by Wm. Rae, that the old system of fees be continued, members 25 cents for one or more entries, and 50 cents for non-members.  Moved by A. Marshall, seconded by C. Nicklin, that the prize list be as follows:

 

White wheat

1st — $2.50, 2nd — $2.00, 3rd — $1.50, 4th — $1.00

Any new variety

1st — $2.00, 2nd — $1.50, 3rd — $1.00

Red wheat

Same as white

Rye

1st — $2.00, 2nd — $1.00

 

No prizes to be awarded unless the sample considered worthy.

 

Moved by W. W. Kenny, seconded by G. A. Darby, that Prof. Zavitz, O.A.C., be judge, with Wm. Rennie as alternate.  Carried.

 

A communication from F. W. Hodson was read, requesting the Institute to inform him of what assistance they would require at their next regular Institute meetings.  It was moved and seconded and agreed to that the arrangements for the next meeting be left to the President, the Secretary, and F. W. Hodson, Superintendent of Institutes.

 

 

 

 

 

Guelph, December 21st 1895.

 

The Directors met at 1:30 in the Township Council Room, Douglas Street, to arrange a programme for the Institute meetings to be held in Guelph on the 20th and 21st of January 1896.  Present were Wm. Rae, 2nd Vice-President, W. W. Kenny, Jas. Hume, W. Buchanan, A. Marshall, and the Secretary, when the following programme was agreed to:

 

 

 

 

 

Guelph, January 20th 1896.

 

The South Wellington Farmers Institute met in the City Hall at 1:30 p.m.  Wm. Rae, 2nd Vice-President, took the chair and gave the opening address.  The speakers named on the programme were present and their addresses were listened to with attention and freely discussed.  About sixty people were present and they expressed themselves highly satisfied with the meeting.

 

Guelph, January 21st 1896.

 

The Institute resumed at 10:30 a.m.  There was an attendance of about fifty and the subjects were well discussed.

 

The afternoon session opened at 1:30.  The attendance was good, about one hundred and twenty being present.  The discussion of the different addresses was entered into keenly.  At the close, a vote of thanks was given to the speakers who expressed themselves highly pleased with the meeting.

 

During the afternoon session, a motion of sympathy was adopted and the Secretary was instructed to forward a copy of the same to Mr. and Mrs. Hobson.

 

The meeting adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

Guelph, March 21st 1896.

 

The Directors of the South Wellington Farmers Institute met at 1 p.m. in the Township Council Room, Douglas Street.  Present were the President, J. I. Hobson, Walter Buchanan, H. Wright, Wm. McCrae, Geo. A. Darby, Geo. North, Peter Iles, James Hume, and the Secretary.  The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

 

The meeting proceeded to discuss the advisability of holding a spring seed fair.  Moved by G. A. Darby, seconded by Geo. North, that a seed fair be held on Saturday the 4th of April.  Carried.

 

Moved by Wm. McCrae, seconded by H. Wright, that the President and Secretary be a committee to arrange for place of show.  Carried.

 

The meeting proceeded to revise the prize list.  Several changes were agreed to and Wm. Rennie, O.A.C., was appointed to act as judge.

 

Wm. McCrae, Geo. North, and Walter Buchanan were appointed a committee to look after the exhibits.

 

The meeting adjourned.

 

 

 

 

 

Guelph, April 4th 1896.

 

The spring seed fair was held in Penfold’s warerooms.  As the roads were almost impassable and the day very stormy, the number of entries was not what they would have been had the weather been favourable.  However, the samples shown were very good and the attendance and interest taken in the show was quite up to former years.

 

There was quite a demand for seed of the new varieties and a considerable amount changed hands.  Wm. Rennie, O.A.C., kindly gave his services as judge, to the satisfaction of all.

 

O. A. Zavitz was present with samples of new varieties of grain and gave an interesting talk while the judging was going on.  The audience that crowded around him showed plainly that his remarks and exhibits were highly appreciated.

 

 

 

 

 

A List of Members of the Puslinch Farmers Club

 for 1874 and 1875-7, and brought up.

(Membership subscriptions — 50 cents.)

 

Hugh Reid

William Rae

Peter Mahon

John Murray

Alexander Smith

William Johnston M. F.

Joseph Grant

James Innes

Duncan McFarlane

Duncan Gilchrist

John Marshall

William Hains

John Cullen

Harold Sorby

James Scott Senior

James McNaughton

Robt. Little

Eugene Rame

James Scott Junior

Hugh McNaughton

Martin Spruhan

William Ross, Morriston

Charles Cockburn

Peter McLean Jr.

John Iles

John McFarlane

James Glennie

Jack McLean

Hugh Cockburn

Malcolm McNaughton

John Mooney

John Sherratt

James Lennie

William Rudd

William Nicoll

John Petty

Samuel Panabecker

William Beatty

Robt. Beattie

David King

Peter McLean Senior

John Scott

William Kerr

Hugh Stewart

James Anderson

Jacob Schultz

Robt. Buchanan

James F. (?) Patterson

Michael P. Doyle

John Laing

Michael Lynch

William Patton

Richd. Maddock

Robt. Beattie

John C. Thompson

W. (?) McNaughton

William Rame (?)

James A. Hume

Patrick McGinnis

William Willoughby

David Stirton

Thomas Carter

James Stirton

 

 

 

 

A List of Members of Puslinch Farmers Club for 1880.

(Membership subscriptions — 25 cents.)

 

Hugh Reid

James Carruthers

Wm. Rae

M. H. Doyle

Peter Mahon

Robert Douglas

Joseph Smith

Duncan McFarlane

James Hume

John Black

James Scott

Alexander McCaig

John Worthington

Robert Beattie

Donald McCarraher

Robert Buchanan

Wm. Kerr

John Eavons

Wm. Black

Hector McCaig

James Patterson

John McKenzie

B. Falconbridge

Hugh Stewart

Thomas Ward

James Scott

John Mulrooney

Robert Brown

Duncan Gilchrist

James Anderson

Alexander Smith

Smith Eavens

James Tavernor

Archibald Gilchrist

Henry Arkell

James Glennie

John Smith

Henry Iles

John Marshall

________ (left blank) Thomas

William McIntosh

John Laing

John Camron

Andrew Ord

Daniel McSooton

John Murray

Alexander Stewart

Elijah Eagle

Neil Marshall

George Aitkinson

James Hume

Thomas Arkell

William Hume

Jacob Schultz

William Hume Jr.

John Blak

John Borthwick

Charles Cobburn

James McPherson

John Clark

Allen Stewart

Wm. Rudd

Nicholas Norris

 

 

 

 

 

A List of Members of the Puslinch Farmers Club for 1881.

(Membership subscriptions — 25 cents)

 

William Rae

James Black

Nicholas Norris

Joe Smith

Robt. Hammersley

William Harltey

James Scott

William P. Hains

William Kerr

Wm. Herbert

Robt. Buchanan

Thomas Walsh

James Hume

Thos. Petty

Charles Cobburn

Thos. Arkell

Duncan Gilchrist

William Young

John Borthwick

J. S. Lehman

John Iles

John Atkinson

John Coulson

John C. Eavans

James Starkey

Alexander Reid

John Mulroney

Alexander Smith

John Hewer

Alexander McCaig

John Thomson

Hugh Clark

John Gordon

James McLaren

William Hume

Hugh Stewart

D. C. McLaren

M. C. Doyle

John Hardy

James Mason

William McCormick

Alexander Marshall

Angus Stewart

Robt. Beattie

Robert Little

James Connelly

Arthur McQuillin

Malcom Clark

Mr. Sinclair

Elijah Eagle

John Smith

Wm. Rudd

James McPherson

Wm. Black

Allen Stewart

Hugh Reid

John Smith

John Laing

Henry Arkell

Archibald Gilchrist

 

 

 

 

List of Members of the Puslinch Farmers Club 1882.

(Membership subscriptions — 25 cents)

 

William Rae

Peter Mahon

James Glennie

Neil Marshall

James Hume

Allen Stewart

William Black

John Haws

James S. Patterson

Elijah Eagle

John Smith

Patrick Mc Garr

Duncan Gilchrist

Duncan McFarlane

Robert Hammersley

Donald McCarragher

Hugh Reid

Henry Grey

James Black

George Atkinson

Archibald Gilchrist

James Lennie

James Taylor

 

John Murray

 

Robt. Beattie

 

Wm. McKenzie

 

Wm. Kerr

 

Wm. P. Hume

 

John Atkinson

 

Joseph Higgins

 

Joseph Smith

 

Lot Sinclair

 

James Mason

 

Robert Douglas

 

Alex McCaig

 

Richard Bell

 

Peter Beaver

 

James Carruthers

 

John Worthington

 

Nicholas Norris

 

Evan McDonald

 

John Laing

 

 

 

 

 

List of Members of the Puslinch Farmers Club 1883.

(Membership subscriptions — 25 cents.)

 

William Black

William McKenzie

William Rae

Duncan McFarlane

M. P. Doyle

Alexander McCaig

Christopher McBeath

John Laing

James S. Patterson

Robert Wilson

Yetman Cherry

Gilbert Kingsberry

Peter Mahon

George Kitchen

Nicholas Norrish

Marshall Holmes

Duncan Gilchrist

Robert Kirby

James Hume

John McPhederon

Robert Douglas

Jonathen Adamson

Lot Singular

James Mason

William Kerr

Andrew Ord

Henry Arkell

Thomas Ingram

Neil Marshall

Hugh Reid Sr.

Archibald Gilchrist

William Nichol

Edward Crawley

William Ross

John Smith

Alex Marshall

Richard Bell

Archibald Marshall

James Carruthers

James Taylor (auction)

John Atkinson

William Stratton

William Johnson

Allan Stewart

David Hume

A. J. Flewwelling

W. T. Hume

George Atkinson

James Starky

George Johnson

Peter Orme

Evans Bros.

John Hume

Charles Kilner

Donald McKeracher

John A. Smith

Joseph Smith

 

Thomas Evans

 

John Gilchrist

 

 

 

 

 

List of Members of the Puslinch Farmers Club 1884.

(Membership subscription — 25 cents)

 

Wm. S. Dickie

Nicholas Norrish

Peter P. (?) Barrett

James Carruthers

Robert Hammersley

Alexander Watt

Barney McQuillan

Peter McKenzie

John Foster

Daniel McNaughton

Robert Douglas

Angus Stewart

James Hume

Peter Mahon

James Fraser

John Kitching

Duncan Gilchrist

Geo. Atkinson

John A. Smith

Smith Evans

Wm. Rae

Elijah Eagle

Hugh Reid Senior

Alex. J. McPherson

James H. Glennie

Jacob Shultz

David Hume

Henry Gray

Charles Kilner

Alex McCaigh

Alexander Smith

John Gilchrist

Duncan McFarlane

 

Peter Beaver

 

Peter McLean Junior

 

Hugh Clarke

 

William Ross

 

Andrew Foley

 

Lot Singular

 

Wm. Nicholl

 

Neil Marshall

 

John Worthington

 

James Scott

 

James Blair

 

Wm. Reid

 

John Smith

 

Wm. A. Dickie

 

Joseph Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of Members of Puslinch Farmers Club 1885.

(Membership subscription — 25 cents.)

 

N. Norrish

John Moffat

John A. Smith

L. Singular

Joseph Smith

Wm. Rae

Joseph Little

Andrew Ord

Allan Stewart

Donald Grant

John Foster

 

Alexander Marshall

 

Robert Hammersley

 

James Hume

 

Duncan Gilchrist

 

Hugh Reid

 

Charles Kilner

 

Alexander Smith

 

James Mason

 

James Blair

 

James Patterson

 

Duncan McFarlane

 

John Worthington

 

Alex Watt

 

William Kerr

 

James Scott

 

P. Mahon

 

Archie Marshall

 

Alexander McCaig

 

Christopher Little

 

Amos Binkley

 

Smith Evans

 

Jacob Shultz

 

John McWilliams

 

David Clark

 

Geo. Johnson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of Members of Puslinch Farmers Club 1886.

(Membership subscription — 25 cents)

 

 

John Paddock

James Scott

James Mason

John Foster

Alexander Smith

James Barker

Joseph Smith

Duncan Gilchrist

James Blair

Wm. Rae

George Atkinson

George Elfner

Alexander McCaig

Lot Singular

Hugh McDiarmid

Wm. Nichol

Jacob Shultz

Charles Calfass

Nicholas Norrish

Christian Morlock

James Patterson

Kenneth McKenzie

Duncan McFarlane

Amos Binkley

Alexander Watt

R. Bell

John A. Smith

P. Mahon

John Worthington

J. B. Doran

R. Douglas

James Hume

Charles Elliss

Wm. Barker

Andrew Monroe

W. Martin

W. H. Cockburn

Donald Stewart

Thomas Amos

J. Mathews (Hespeler)

John Weir

J. Carracher (Guelph T.)

George Darby (Guelph Township)

W. West

George Kitching (Nassagaweya)

P. Newstead

Peter McKenzie

Jas. Hewer

Charles Kilner

Elijah Eagle

Blair Falconbridge

Alex. J. McPherson

W. J. Cockburn

Smith Evans

H. Hamilton

W. Cowan

Edward Taylor

Wm. Laycock

James Black

G. Johnston

George Frazer

John Vallance

Herbert Hammersley

Hy Gray

 

John McWilliams

 

 

 

 

List of Members of the Puslinch Farmers Club for 1887.

(Membership subscription — 25 cents.)

 

 

Joseph Smith

Alex Reid

John Foster

Walter Cowan

Charles Kilner

P. McLaren

Herbert Hammersley

Geo. G. Johnston

Lot Singular

James S. Patterson

Donald Stewart

Robert Douglas

John Nicklin

James Mason

Thomas Amos

James Scott

W. J. Cockburn

John Doran

Hugh Cockburn

John McAteer

John A. Cockburn

Charles Sockett

Mathew Martin

James McRobbie

John Murray

Dan Heffernan

Neil Marshall

W. A. Christie

John Worthington

G. B. Hood

James Blair

E. Eagle

Edward Taylor

Hugh Reid

Thomas Weir

F. H. Wilcox

Nicholas Norrish

W. J. Rudd

Frank Hamilton

Smith Evans

George Atkinson

Wm. Rea

J. A. Cockburn

John I. Hobson

P. Falconbridge

Harry Doughty

B. Wilson

Joseph Little

Robt. Erwin

 

Wm. McKenzie

 

Jacob Shoultz

 

Alex McCaig

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of Members for 1888.

 

Joseph Smith

Robert Buchanan

P. Mahon

Alex McCaig

James Scott

F. H. Wilcox

John Foster

N. Norrish

Major Hood

James Hume

W. J. Cockburn

John Duff

M. Martin

W. West

John Illes

Thos. Weir

Robt. Lamb

W. A. Rudd

John Mullroney

P. Beaver

James Laidlaw

Mat French

John McAteer

John Worthington

Wm. Rae

A. Ord

James Laidlaw Jr.

Jacob Shultz

A. Whitelaw

James Mason

Thos. Manderson

Alex. Reid

Alex. McIntosh

James Blair

John McCorkindale

James Atkins

Wm. McCrae

W. A. Dickie

James Lewis

E. Taylor

Robt. Shortread

J. Taylor

W. W. Kenny

N. Marshall

Jos. Little

A. Marshall

G. O’Connor

Robt. Hammersley

M. J. Doran

George G. Johnstone

John Kerau ( ?)

W. J. Rudd

John J. Hobson

Prof. Greenside

W. D. Sorby

W. Watters

Robt. Hamilton

W. J. Couzins

Joseph Fletcher

A. Ramsey (?)

John Black

_____ (blank) Taylor

Hugh Black

 

Thos. McCrea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Members Roll of the South Wellington Farmers Institute for 1889

 

P. Mahon (President)

Evan Gilchrist (Aberfoyle)

James Laidlaw (Vice-President)

J. A. Smith (Aberfoyle)

W. J. Cockburn (Secretary-Treasurer)

J. Tawse (Aberfoyle)

Wm. Rae (Arkell)

Jas. Mason

W. W. Kenny (Guelph)

Alex McCaig

Thos. Waters (Rockwood)

Alex Smith

G. B. Hood (Guelph)

J. S. Patterson

W. McCrae (Guelph)

Geo. Atkinson (Marden)

Prof. Greenside (Guelph)

E. Parkinson (Eramosa)

A. Fife (Guelph)

B. Tennant (Freelton)

R. McRim (?)(Guelph)

Geo. G. Johnson (Mountsberg)

Geo. Alderson (Guelph)

P. Beaver (Morriston)

A. H. Whitelaw (Guelph)

Jacob Shultz

Jos. Little (Hespeler)

Wm. Ray

Jno. Scott (Kiallean)

D. & O. Sorby (Gourock)

A. Johnston (Eramosa)

M. P. Doyl

D. McKenzie (Corwhin)

W. West (Guelph)

Jno. Foster (Aberfoyle)

S. O. Barber (Guelph)

R. Douglas (Aberfoyle)

P. Harknet (Guelph)

Jno. Douglas (Aberfoyle)

J. I. Hobson (Mosboro)

D. Gilchrist (Aberfoyle)

 

Jos. Smith (Aberfoyle)

 

Robt. Bucannan (Gourock)

 

M. Neighbour

 

Jas. Steele (Aberfoyle)

 

Jno. Cockburn (Aberfoyle)

 

Lot Singular (Aberfoyle)

 

C. McBeath (Aberfoyle)

 

Thos. Amos (Aberfoyle)

 

Jas. Blair (Aberfoyle)

 

Jas Crauthers (Aberfoyle)

 

W. T. Hains

 

Jas. Wright (Guelph)

 

W. Kreyton (?) (Guelph)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Members Roll of the South Wellington Farmers Institute 1990.

 

James Laidlaw (President)

Martin Hawkins

Thos. Waters (Vice-President)

Wm. Hodskinson

P. Mahon (Secretary-Treasurer)

John McCorkindale

W. McCrae (Guelph)

Thos. Welsh

G. B. Hood (Guelph)

James Hume

D. Gilchrist (Puslinch)

Alex Fife

Wm. Rae (Puslinch)

James Love

James Anderson (Puslinch)

John Ramsay

John Iles (Puslinch)

Joseph Little

Robt. Douglas (Puslinch)

John Laing

Robt. Buchanan (Puslinch)

John Tovell

W. W. Kenny (Guelph)

Jas. Auld

Geo. A. Darby (Guelph)

Chas. Austin

Albert Wright (Guelph)

Thos. Laidlaw

W. J. Cockburn (Puslinch)

Prof. Jas. Mills

John Foster (Puslinch)

Robt. Shortreed

R. Tolton (Eramosa)

N. Norrish

Thos. Moran (Puslinch)

Sheriff McRim

David Stirton (Guelph)

Hugh Black

W. H. Richards

T. J. Day

J. Farrow

John Mutrie

John Murray (Puslinch)

_______ (left blank) Parkinson

Joseph Smith (Puslinch)

Frank Dowler

Peter McLean (Puslinch)

 

J. E. McLean (Puslinch)

 

John McAteer (Guelph)

 

Allan Stewart (Puslinch)

 

P. Falconbridge (Puslinch)

 

John Daran (Puslinch)

 

W. F. Clark (Guelph)

 

John I. Hobson (Guelph)

 

Prof. Thos. Shaw (Guelph)

 

M. P. Doyle (Puslinch)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

End of record.